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Intraocular Penetration of Locally Applied Steroids

Intraocular Penetration of Locally Applied Steroids Abstract Hydrocortisone acetate (Compound F acetate) has been shown to be superior to cortisone acetate (Compound E acetate) as an antiphlogistic agent in the treatment of many external ocular lesions, such as vernal conjunctivitis and episcleritis. This superiority, however, is not apparent in the treatment of anterior segment intraocular inflammation, such as uveitis, by local instillation of drops.* The free-alcohol form of hydrocortisone is considered to be more effective than the acetate in the treatment of intraocular lesions by local administration.† In a recent publication from this laboratory4 it was shown that hydrocortisone acetate entered the anterior chamber of rabbit eyes less rapidly and to a less extent than did cortisone acetate after local application. This observation may explain the difference in the relative efficacy of the two steroid acetates in the treatment of intraocular inflammation. If the extent of penetration of the drug is an important determinant of the References 1. References 1 and 2. 2. References 3 and 4. 3. McDonald, P. R.; Leopold, I. H.; Vogel, A. W., and Mulberger, R. D.: Hydrocortisone, Compound F, in Ophthalmology , A. M. A. Arch. Ophth. 49:400, 1953.Crossref 4. Hogan, M. J.; Thygeson, P., and Kimura, A. S.: Uses and Abuses of Adrenal Steroids and Corticotropin , Tr. Am. Ophth. Soc. 52:145, 1954 5. A. M. A. Arch. Ophth. 53:165, 1955.Crossref 6. Gordon, D. M.: Ocular Therapy with the Topical Application of Hydrocortisone , Ann. New York Acad. Sc. 61:549, 1955.Crossref 7. Weimar, V. L., and Leopold, I. H.: Intraocular Penetration of Local Hydrocortisone and Cortisone , A. M. A. Arch. Ophth. 52:769, 1954.Crossref 8. Green, H.; Sawyer, J. L., and Leopold, I. H.: Investigation of Corticosteroids in the Aqueous Humor of Normal Animal Eyes: II. Further Observations , Am. J. Ophth. 39:871, 1955. 9. Hamashige, S., and Potts, A. M.: Penetration of Cortisone and Hydrocortisone into the Ocular Structures, Am. J. Ophth., to be published. 10. Cogan, D. G., and Hirsch, E. O.: The Cornea: VII. Permeability to Weak Electrolytes , Arch. Ophth. 32:276, 1944.Crossref 11. Swan, K. C., and White, N. G.: Corneal Permeability: 1. Factors Affecting Penetration of Drugs into the Cornea , Am. J. Ophth. 25:1043, 1942. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Intraocular Penetration of Locally Applied Steroids

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1955 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6339
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1955.00930020922017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Hydrocortisone acetate (Compound F acetate) has been shown to be superior to cortisone acetate (Compound E acetate) as an antiphlogistic agent in the treatment of many external ocular lesions, such as vernal conjunctivitis and episcleritis. This superiority, however, is not apparent in the treatment of anterior segment intraocular inflammation, such as uveitis, by local instillation of drops.* The free-alcohol form of hydrocortisone is considered to be more effective than the acetate in the treatment of intraocular lesions by local administration.† In a recent publication from this laboratory4 it was shown that hydrocortisone acetate entered the anterior chamber of rabbit eyes less rapidly and to a less extent than did cortisone acetate after local application. This observation may explain the difference in the relative efficacy of the two steroid acetates in the treatment of intraocular inflammation. If the extent of penetration of the drug is an important determinant of the References 1. References 1 and 2. 2. References 3 and 4. 3. McDonald, P. R.; Leopold, I. H.; Vogel, A. W., and Mulberger, R. D.: Hydrocortisone, Compound F, in Ophthalmology , A. M. A. Arch. Ophth. 49:400, 1953.Crossref 4. Hogan, M. J.; Thygeson, P., and Kimura, A. S.: Uses and Abuses of Adrenal Steroids and Corticotropin , Tr. Am. Ophth. Soc. 52:145, 1954 5. A. M. A. Arch. Ophth. 53:165, 1955.Crossref 6. Gordon, D. M.: Ocular Therapy with the Topical Application of Hydrocortisone , Ann. New York Acad. Sc. 61:549, 1955.Crossref 7. Weimar, V. L., and Leopold, I. H.: Intraocular Penetration of Local Hydrocortisone and Cortisone , A. M. A. Arch. Ophth. 52:769, 1954.Crossref 8. Green, H.; Sawyer, J. L., and Leopold, I. H.: Investigation of Corticosteroids in the Aqueous Humor of Normal Animal Eyes: II. Further Observations , Am. J. Ophth. 39:871, 1955. 9. Hamashige, S., and Potts, A. M.: Penetration of Cortisone and Hydrocortisone into the Ocular Structures, Am. J. Ophth., to be published. 10. Cogan, D. G., and Hirsch, E. O.: The Cornea: VII. Permeability to Weak Electrolytes , Arch. Ophth. 32:276, 1944.Crossref 11. Swan, K. C., and White, N. G.: Corneal Permeability: 1. Factors Affecting Penetration of Drugs into the Cornea , Am. J. Ophth. 25:1043, 1942.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1955

References