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Intracorneal Silicone Fluid

Intracorneal Silicone Fluid Abstract Introduction A variety of different plastic materials have been used as experimental intracorneal lenses or membranes.6-11 Resultant clouding and vascularization of the cornea or degeneration of stromal tissue have been disappointing. It was thought that fluid silicone might be better tolerated and less impair nutritional exchange.The possibility was entertained that by injecting silicone fluid between the layers of corneal stroma the change in corneal curvature might be sufficient to correct a major portion of the refractive error in aphakia. We were also interested in determining if a thin intracorneal layer of the silicone might serve as a barrier to the passage of fluid through the cornea from the anterior chamber in the presence of an injured or diseased endothelium. Materials and Methods The liquid silicone used in this study was one of the Dow Corning "200 fluids" having 1,000 centistoke viscosity and a refractive index of 1.4035. The References 1. Dow Corning Bulletin 05-014. 2. Stone, W., Jr.: Alloplasty in Surgery of Eye , New Eng J Med 258:486-490, 1958.Crossref 3. Armaly, M. D.: Ocular Tolerance to Silicones: I. Replacement of Aqueous and Vitreous by Silicone Fluids , Arch Ophthal 68:390-395, 1962.Crossref 4. Cibis, P. A., et al, read before the Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, Chicago, June 26, 1962. 5. Levine, A. M., and Ellis, R. A.: Intraocular Liquid Silicone Implants , Amer J Ophthal 55:939-943, 1963. 6. Krwawicz, T.: New Plastic Operation for Correcting Refractive Error of Aphakic Eyes by Changing Corneal Curvature: Preliminary Report , Brit J Ophthal 45:59-63, 1961.Crossref 7. Stone, W., Jr., and Herbert, E.: Experimental Study of Plastic Material as Replacement for Cornea: Preliminary Report , Amer J Ophthal 36:168-173 (June, (pt 2) ) 1953. 8. Stone, W., Jr.: Study of Patency of Openings in Corneas Anterior to Interlamellar Plastic Artificial Discs , Amer J Ophthal 39:185-195 (Feb, (pt 2) ) 1955. 9. Boch, R. H., and Maumenee, A. E.: Corneal Fluid Metabolism: Experiments and Observations , Arch Ophthal 50:282-285, 1953.Crossref 10. Knowles, W. F.: Effect of Intralamellar Plastic Membranes on Corneal Physiology , Amer J Ophthal 51:1145-1156 (May, (pt 2) ) 1961. 11. Bowen, S. F., et al: Intracorneal Lens: Experimental Study , Proc Mayo Clin 36:627-632, 1961. 12. McCulloch, C.; Thompson, G. A.; and Basu, P. K.: Lamellar Keratoplasty Using Full Thickness Donor Material , Trans Amer Ophthal Soc 61:154-180, 1963. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1965 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1965.00970030092021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Introduction A variety of different plastic materials have been used as experimental intracorneal lenses or membranes.6-11 Resultant clouding and vascularization of the cornea or degeneration of stromal tissue have been disappointing. It was thought that fluid silicone might be better tolerated and less impair nutritional exchange.The possibility was entertained that by injecting silicone fluid between the layers of corneal stroma the change in corneal curvature might be sufficient to correct a major portion of the refractive error in aphakia. We were also interested in determining if a thin intracorneal layer of the silicone might serve as a barrier to the passage of fluid through the cornea from the anterior chamber in the presence of an injured or diseased endothelium. Materials and Methods The liquid silicone used in this study was one of the Dow Corning "200 fluids" having 1,000 centistoke viscosity and a refractive index of 1.4035. The References 1. Dow Corning Bulletin 05-014. 2. Stone, W., Jr.: Alloplasty in Surgery of Eye , New Eng J Med 258:486-490, 1958.Crossref 3. Armaly, M. D.: Ocular Tolerance to Silicones: I. Replacement of Aqueous and Vitreous by Silicone Fluids , Arch Ophthal 68:390-395, 1962.Crossref 4. Cibis, P. A., et al, read before the Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, Chicago, June 26, 1962. 5. Levine, A. M., and Ellis, R. A.: Intraocular Liquid Silicone Implants , Amer J Ophthal 55:939-943, 1963. 6. Krwawicz, T.: New Plastic Operation for Correcting Refractive Error of Aphakic Eyes by Changing Corneal Curvature: Preliminary Report , Brit J Ophthal 45:59-63, 1961.Crossref 7. Stone, W., Jr., and Herbert, E.: Experimental Study of Plastic Material as Replacement for Cornea: Preliminary Report , Amer J Ophthal 36:168-173 (June, (pt 2) ) 1953. 8. Stone, W., Jr.: Study of Patency of Openings in Corneas Anterior to Interlamellar Plastic Artificial Discs , Amer J Ophthal 39:185-195 (Feb, (pt 2) ) 1955. 9. Boch, R. H., and Maumenee, A. E.: Corneal Fluid Metabolism: Experiments and Observations , Arch Ophthal 50:282-285, 1953.Crossref 10. Knowles, W. F.: Effect of Intralamellar Plastic Membranes on Corneal Physiology , Amer J Ophthal 51:1145-1156 (May, (pt 2) ) 1961. 11. Bowen, S. F., et al: Intracorneal Lens: Experimental Study , Proc Mayo Clin 36:627-632, 1961. 12. McCulloch, C.; Thompson, G. A.; and Basu, P. K.: Lamellar Keratoplasty Using Full Thickness Donor Material , Trans Amer Ophthal Soc 61:154-180, 1963.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1965

References

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