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INTESTINAL PNEUMATOSIS

INTESTINAL PNEUMATOSIS Intestinal pneumatosis is a rare condition characterized by the presence of gas in endothelial-lined spaces in the intestinal wall and by a chronic productive inflammation in the surrounding tissue. Turnure1 and Mills2 have reviewed the literature, the latter collecting the reports of 100 cases. In only one of these did the disease occur in an infant; this was in a case reported by Maass.3 During the past three years I have encountered four cases in children at the Babies and Childrens Hospital. This incidence of four cases in 260 autopsies convinces me that the disease in infants is more frequent than has been supposed. REPORT OF CASES Case 1.—A white girl, aged 9 weeks, was admitted to the hospital with a history of convulsions of four hours' duration. Examination revealed dehydration, respiratory difficulty and clonic spasm of the face and extremities. Diarrhea had existed for two days, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1929 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1929.01930100138015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Intestinal pneumatosis is a rare condition characterized by the presence of gas in endothelial-lined spaces in the intestinal wall and by a chronic productive inflammation in the surrounding tissue. Turnure1 and Mills2 have reviewed the literature, the latter collecting the reports of 100 cases. In only one of these did the disease occur in an infant; this was in a case reported by Maass.3 During the past three years I have encountered four cases in children at the Babies and Childrens Hospital. This incidence of four cases in 260 autopsies convinces me that the disease in infants is more frequent than has been supposed. REPORT OF CASES Case 1.—A white girl, aged 9 weeks, was admitted to the hospital with a history of convulsions of four hours' duration. Examination revealed dehydration, respiratory difficulty and clonic spasm of the face and extremities. Diarrhea had existed for two days,

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1929

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