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INTESTINAL IMPLANTATION OF THE BACILLUS LACTIS BULGARICUS IN CERTAIN INTESTINAL CONDITIONS OF INFANTS, WITH REPORT OF CASES

INTESTINAL IMPLANTATION OF THE BACILLUS LACTIS BULGARICUS IN CERTAIN INTESTINAL CONDITIONS OF... Buttermilk has been widely used in infant-feeding because its chemical composition was supposed to be adapted to certain abnormalities of digestion and metabolism; but the results obtained from its use have been variable, since buttermilk is not always adapted to the caloric needs of the infant. A few years ago, I reported1 a series of cases in which buttermilk was used as a dietetic treatment for malnutrition, enteritis, enterocolitis, etc., and many similar cases have been reported by various writers from time to time. While the prostration and toxic symptoms were usually lessened under this regimen, some infants fared badly on the diet, so that the dietetic treatment was usually supplemented by medicinal methods; hence, any improvement in the condition could not be attributed solely to the presence of lactic acid bacilli in the milk. Moreover, the buttermilk was sometimes boiled in the process of making the feeding mixtures, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

INTESTINAL IMPLANTATION OF THE BACILLUS LACTIS BULGARICUS IN CERTAIN INTESTINAL CONDITIONS OF INFANTS, WITH REPORT OF CASES

JAMA , Volume LVIII (26) – Jun 29, 1912

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1912 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1912.04260060370005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Buttermilk has been widely used in infant-feeding because its chemical composition was supposed to be adapted to certain abnormalities of digestion and metabolism; but the results obtained from its use have been variable, since buttermilk is not always adapted to the caloric needs of the infant. A few years ago, I reported1 a series of cases in which buttermilk was used as a dietetic treatment for malnutrition, enteritis, enterocolitis, etc., and many similar cases have been reported by various writers from time to time. While the prostration and toxic symptoms were usually lessened under this regimen, some infants fared badly on the diet, so that the dietetic treatment was usually supplemented by medicinal methods; hence, any improvement in the condition could not be attributed solely to the presence of lactic acid bacilli in the milk. Moreover, the buttermilk was sometimes boiled in the process of making the feeding mixtures,

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 29, 1912

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