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INTERRUPTION OF BULBOCAPNINE CATALEPSY IN RATS BY ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS

INTERRUPTION OF BULBOCAPNINE CATALEPSY IN RATS BY ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS Abstract IT IS WELL known that several drugs produce symptoms which closely resemble common clinical syndromes seen in certain psychiatric patients. Since 1910 considerable attention has been focused on the effects of one of these drugs, bulbocapnine, which experimentally produces in animals practically all of the motor manifestations seen in human catatonia. In a long series of experiments extending over many years, deJong and collaborators exhaustively studied the relation of bulbocapnine catalepsy to human catatonia.1 They concluded that the phenomena are very similar and that bulbocapnine and other catalepsyproducing drugs have a common denominator in that all produce a derangement in the metabolism of the central nervous system which results in the catatonia. The work of deJong has been critically treated by Ferraro and Barrera2; and their monograph, together with deJong's book, presents a comprehensive review of the subject of bulbocapnine catalepsy. Several studies have been made in this References 1. DeJong, H. H.: Experimental Catatonia: A General Reaction-Form of the Central Nervous System and Its Implications for Human Pathology , Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins Company, 1945, p. 225. 2. Ferraro, A., and Barrera, S. E.: Experimental Catalepsy , New York State Hospitals Press, 1932, p. 119. 3. Richter, C. P., and Paterson, A. S.: Bulbocapnine Catalepsy and the Grasp Reflex , J. Pharmacol. & Exper. Therap. 43:677, 1931. 4. Paterson, A. S., and Richter, C. P.: Action of Scopolamine and Carbon Dioxide on Catalepsy Produced by Bulbocapnine , Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 29:231 ( (Feb.) ) 1933. 5. Loevenhart, A. S.; Lorenz, W. F., and Waters, R. M.: Cerebral Stimulation , J. A. M. A. 92:880 ( (March 16) ) 1929. 6. Buchman, E. F., and Richter, C. P.: Abolition of Bulbocapnine Catatonia by Cocaine , Arch, Neurol & Psychiat. 29:479 ( (March) ) 1933. 7. Berger, H.: Untersuchungen über den Zellgehalt der menschlichen Grosshirnrinde , Ztschr. f. d. ges. Neurol. u. Psychiat. 69:46, 1921. 8. Fleck, U.: Über Cocainwirkung bei Stuporösen , Ztschr. f. d. ges. Neurol. u. Psychiat. 92:84, 1924. 9. Levine, M., and Wolff, H. G.: Cerebral Circulation: Afferent Impulses from Blood Vessels of the Pia , Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 28:140 ( (July) ) 1932. 10. Wagner, H. N., Jr.: Objective Testing of Vision with the Use of the Galvanic Skin Response , Arch. Ophth. 43:529 ( (March) ) 1950. 11. This chamber consisted of a circular metal drum 30 inches (76 cm.) in diameter and 4 feet (120 cm.) in height. A 4 inch bell operated by three no. 6 dry cells was suspended by a cord in the center of the chamber 12 inches (30 cm.) from the floor. The chamber was covered with plate glass to permit observation. 12. The chamber consists of a box 12 by 12 by 18 inches (30 by 30 by 46 cm.) with a glass front to permit observation. The floor is a metal grill, alternate rods of which are wired to the terminals of an induction coil. A switch in the circuit permits the operator to deliver current to the grill at his discretion, thus giving them a shock. 13. Richter, C. P.: Use of the Wild Norway Rat for Psychiatric Research , J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 110:379, 1949. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

INTERRUPTION OF BULBOCAPNINE CATALEPSY IN RATS BY ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1950 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6886
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1950.02310290116013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract IT IS WELL known that several drugs produce symptoms which closely resemble common clinical syndromes seen in certain psychiatric patients. Since 1910 considerable attention has been focused on the effects of one of these drugs, bulbocapnine, which experimentally produces in animals practically all of the motor manifestations seen in human catatonia. In a long series of experiments extending over many years, deJong and collaborators exhaustively studied the relation of bulbocapnine catalepsy to human catatonia.1 They concluded that the phenomena are very similar and that bulbocapnine and other catalepsyproducing drugs have a common denominator in that all produce a derangement in the metabolism of the central nervous system which results in the catatonia. The work of deJong has been critically treated by Ferraro and Barrera2; and their monograph, together with deJong's book, presents a comprehensive review of the subject of bulbocapnine catalepsy. Several studies have been made in this References 1. DeJong, H. H.: Experimental Catatonia: A General Reaction-Form of the Central Nervous System and Its Implications for Human Pathology , Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins Company, 1945, p. 225. 2. Ferraro, A., and Barrera, S. E.: Experimental Catalepsy , New York State Hospitals Press, 1932, p. 119. 3. Richter, C. P., and Paterson, A. S.: Bulbocapnine Catalepsy and the Grasp Reflex , J. Pharmacol. & Exper. Therap. 43:677, 1931. 4. Paterson, A. S., and Richter, C. P.: Action of Scopolamine and Carbon Dioxide on Catalepsy Produced by Bulbocapnine , Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 29:231 ( (Feb.) ) 1933. 5. Loevenhart, A. S.; Lorenz, W. F., and Waters, R. M.: Cerebral Stimulation , J. A. M. A. 92:880 ( (March 16) ) 1929. 6. Buchman, E. F., and Richter, C. P.: Abolition of Bulbocapnine Catatonia by Cocaine , Arch, Neurol & Psychiat. 29:479 ( (March) ) 1933. 7. Berger, H.: Untersuchungen über den Zellgehalt der menschlichen Grosshirnrinde , Ztschr. f. d. ges. Neurol. u. Psychiat. 69:46, 1921. 8. Fleck, U.: Über Cocainwirkung bei Stuporösen , Ztschr. f. d. ges. Neurol. u. Psychiat. 92:84, 1924. 9. Levine, M., and Wolff, H. G.: Cerebral Circulation: Afferent Impulses from Blood Vessels of the Pia , Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 28:140 ( (July) ) 1932. 10. Wagner, H. N., Jr.: Objective Testing of Vision with the Use of the Galvanic Skin Response , Arch. Ophth. 43:529 ( (March) ) 1950. 11. This chamber consisted of a circular metal drum 30 inches (76 cm.) in diameter and 4 feet (120 cm.) in height. A 4 inch bell operated by three no. 6 dry cells was suspended by a cord in the center of the chamber 12 inches (30 cm.) from the floor. The chamber was covered with plate glass to permit observation. 12. The chamber consists of a box 12 by 12 by 18 inches (30 by 30 by 46 cm.) with a glass front to permit observation. The floor is a metal grill, alternate rods of which are wired to the terminals of an induction coil. A switch in the circuit permits the operator to deliver current to the grill at his discretion, thus giving them a shock. 13. Richter, C. P.: Use of the Wild Norway Rat for Psychiatric Research , J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 110:379, 1949.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1950

References