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Interpretation of Specific Gravity by Dipstick

Interpretation of Specific Gravity by Dipstick Abstract Sir.—The widespread use of dipsticks such as the Ames N-Multistix-SG strip (Miles Laboratories, Elkhart, Ind) has some built-in problems as well as a form of medical laboratory absurdity. Comments have been made in the more general literature, but to date we have not read a comment in a pediatric journal. I refer specifically to the use of the term specific gravity that one reads from these strips. The measurement of specific gravity in urine has been used in clinical medicine for a number of years with known advantages and disadvantages. One advantage is that in the absence of albumin and glucose, the specific gravity has a nearly linear correspondence to osmolality over the range of interest to the clinician. This correlation enables one to detect the ability of the kidney to concentrate and dilute, which is a sensitive measure of renal function. This usefulness is lost if there is References 1. Gault MH, Whelan VC, Longerich LL, et al: Assessment of specific gravity determined by Ames N-Multistix-SG . Clin Biochem 1984;17: 292-295.Crossref 2. Dorner K: Further evaluation of the SG Test Strip for estimation of urinary osmolality . J Clin Chem Clin Biochem 1984;22:419-425. 3. Burkhardt AE, Johnston KG, Waszak CE, et al: A reagent strip for measuring the specific gravity of urine . Clin Chem 1981;28:2068-2072. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Interpretation of Specific Gravity by Dipstick

Interpretation of Specific Gravity by Dipstick

Abstract

Abstract Sir.—The widespread use of dipsticks such as the Ames N-Multistix-SG strip (Miles Laboratories, Elkhart, Ind) has some built-in problems as well as a form of medical laboratory absurdity. Comments have been made in the more general literature, but to date we have not read a comment in a pediatric journal. I refer specifically to the use of the term specific gravity that one reads from these strips. The measurement of specific gravity in urine has been used in clinical medicine...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1988.02150060026016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Sir.—The widespread use of dipsticks such as the Ames N-Multistix-SG strip (Miles Laboratories, Elkhart, Ind) has some built-in problems as well as a form of medical laboratory absurdity. Comments have been made in the more general literature, but to date we have not read a comment in a pediatric journal. I refer specifically to the use of the term specific gravity that one reads from these strips. The measurement of specific gravity in urine has been used in clinical medicine for a number of years with known advantages and disadvantages. One advantage is that in the absence of albumin and glucose, the specific gravity has a nearly linear correspondence to osmolality over the range of interest to the clinician. This correlation enables one to detect the ability of the kidney to concentrate and dilute, which is a sensitive measure of renal function. This usefulness is lost if there is References 1. Gault MH, Whelan VC, Longerich LL, et al: Assessment of specific gravity determined by Ames N-Multistix-SG . Clin Biochem 1984;17: 292-295.Crossref 2. Dorner K: Further evaluation of the SG Test Strip for estimation of urinary osmolality . J Clin Chem Clin Biochem 1984;22:419-425. 3. Burkhardt AE, Johnston KG, Waszak CE, et al: A reagent strip for measuring the specific gravity of urine . Clin Chem 1981;28:2068-2072.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1988

References