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International Symposium on Opportunistic Fungous Infections

International Symposium on Opportunistic Fungous Infections Abstract An International Symposium on Opportunistic Fungous Infections was held at Duke University School of Medicine on June 28 to 30, 1962, at which data were presented to elucidate the factors that contribute and predispose to the increase in incidence and variety of mycotic infections that are being widely encountered. The importance of determining the natural habitat of pathogenic fungi was initially stressed with particular emphasis being placed on the necessity to procure data on the ecology and distribution of those fungi which thrive as saprophytes in nature and are the cause of most mycotic infections (Ajello, L., Atlanta). Data were then presented to show that Aspergillus fumigatus can be readily isolated from decomposing leaves, Sporotrichum schenckii from growing vegetation, and Cryptococcus neoformans from pigeon guano (Emmons, C. W., Bethesda, Md.) with reference being made to the association of Histoplasma capsulatum with chicken and bat guano (Vanbreuseghem, R., Antwerp) and Geotrichum http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

International Symposium on Opportunistic Fungous Infections

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 87 (1) – Jan 1, 1963

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1963 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1963.01590130014005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract An International Symposium on Opportunistic Fungous Infections was held at Duke University School of Medicine on June 28 to 30, 1962, at which data were presented to elucidate the factors that contribute and predispose to the increase in incidence and variety of mycotic infections that are being widely encountered. The importance of determining the natural habitat of pathogenic fungi was initially stressed with particular emphasis being placed on the necessity to procure data on the ecology and distribution of those fungi which thrive as saprophytes in nature and are the cause of most mycotic infections (Ajello, L., Atlanta). Data were then presented to show that Aspergillus fumigatus can be readily isolated from decomposing leaves, Sporotrichum schenckii from growing vegetation, and Cryptococcus neoformans from pigeon guano (Emmons, C. W., Bethesda, Md.) with reference being made to the association of Histoplasma capsulatum with chicken and bat guano (Vanbreuseghem, R., Antwerp) and Geotrichum

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1963

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