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Interleukin 2 and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Induce a Perivascular Lymphocytic Infiltrate in a Skin Explant Model

Interleukin 2 and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Induce a Perivascular... Abstract • Cutaneous eruptions displaying perivascular inflammatory cell infiltrates histologically may develop with the intravenous administration of cytokines. Similar findings are seen spontaneously in some patients on recovery of peripheral blood lymphocytes after profound marrow aplasia. To investigate the production of a cutaneous perivascular infiltrate further, the ability of several cytokines to induce a perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate was studied in vitro using a skin explant model. A skin biopsy specimen obtained at the time of peripheral blood lymphocyte recovery after chemotherapy-induced marrow aplasia (n = 10) was divided and incubated for 3 days with and without a series of cytokines Plus various peripheral blood mononuclear cell populations. Skin incubated with interleukin 2 and granulocyte-macro-phage colony-stimulating factor induced a perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate, while control samples did not. Immunophenotypic analysis revealed that the lymphocytes were predominantly CD3+/CD4+. An infiltrate was not observed when skin was incubated with cytokines alone, without the addition of simultaneously isolated peripheral lymphocytes. A perivascular pattern was not observed with the addition of interferon gamma. Only interferon gamma induced keratinocyte intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression in experimental tissue. Certain cytokines that affect a range of cell types are capable of inducing a common cutaneous pattern, the perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate. References 1. Grimm EA, Mazumder A, Zhang HZ, Rosenberg SA. Lymphokine-activated killer cell phenomenon: lysis of natural killer-resistant fresh solid tumor cells by activated autologous human peripheral blood lymphocytes . J Exp Med . 1982;155:1823-1841.Crossref 2. Klingemann HG, Eaves AC, Barnett MJ, et al. Recombinant GM-CSF in patients with poor graft function after bone marrow transplantation . Clin Invest Med . 1990;13:77-81. 3. Horn TD, Burke PJ, Karp JE, Hood AF. Intravenous administration of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor causes a cutaneous eruption . Arch Dermatol . 1991;127:49-52.Crossref 4. Horn TD, Redd JV, Karp JE, Beschorner WE, Burke PJ, Hood AF. Cutaneous eruptions of lymphocyte recovery . Arch Dermatol . 1989;125:1512-1517.Crossref 5. Hood AF, Vogelsang GB, Black LP, Farmer ER, Santos GW. Acute graft-vs-host disease: development following autologous and syngeneic bone marrow transplantation . Arch Dermatol . 1987; 123:745-750.Crossref 6. Belanger R, Tutschka PJ, Beschorner WE, Hess AD, Santos GW. Acute graft-vs-host disease in recipients of syngeneic bone marrow . Exp Hematol . 1982;10( (suppl) ):23-32. 7. Jones RJ, Vogelsang GB, Hess AD, et al. Induction of graft-vs-host disease after autologous bone marrow transplantation . Lancet . 1989;1:754-757.Crossref 8. Horn TD, Kerker BJ, Karp JE, Burke PH, Hood AF. Endothelial expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is unaffected by marrow aplasia-inducing chemotherapy . J Cutan Pathol . 1991;18:36-39.Crossref 9. Vogelsang GB, Hess AD, Berkman AW, et al. An in vitro predictive test for graft versus host disease in patients with genotypic HLA-identical bone marrow transplants . N Engl J Med . 1985;313:645-650.Crossref 10. Beschorner WE, Farmer ER, Saral R, Stirling WL, Santos GW. Epithelial class II antigen expression in cutaneous graft-versus host disease . Transplantation . 1987;44:237-243.Crossref 11. Nickloff BJ, Reusch MA, Bensch K, Karasek MA. Preferential binding by monocytes and Leu 2 + lymphocytes to interferon gamma treated cultured skin endothelial cells and keratinocytes . Arch Dermatol Res . 1988;280:235-245.Crossref 12. Nickloff BJ. The role of gamma interferon in cutaneous trafficking of lymphocytes with emphasis on molecular and cellular adhesion events . Arch Dermatol . 1988;124:1835-1843.Crossref 13. Wong RL, Lingenheld EG, Fitzgerald L, Clark RB. Murine T helper cell clones secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GmCSF) by both interleukin-2-dependent and interleukin-2-independent pathways . Cell Immunol . 1989;123:445-455.Crossref 14. Kupper TS, Lee F, Coleman D, Chodakewitz J, Flood P, Horowitz M. Keratinocyte derived T-cell growth factor (KTGF) is identical to granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF) . J Invest Dermatol . 1988;91:185-188.Crossref 15. Willman CL, Stewart CC, Miller V, Yi T, Tomasi TB. Regulation of MHC class II gene expression in macrophages by hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors (CSF) . J Exp Med . 1989;170:1559-1567.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Interleukin 2 and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Induce a Perivascular Lymphocytic Infiltrate in a Skin Explant Model

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1991.04520010035003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • Cutaneous eruptions displaying perivascular inflammatory cell infiltrates histologically may develop with the intravenous administration of cytokines. Similar findings are seen spontaneously in some patients on recovery of peripheral blood lymphocytes after profound marrow aplasia. To investigate the production of a cutaneous perivascular infiltrate further, the ability of several cytokines to induce a perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate was studied in vitro using a skin explant model. A skin biopsy specimen obtained at the time of peripheral blood lymphocyte recovery after chemotherapy-induced marrow aplasia (n = 10) was divided and incubated for 3 days with and without a series of cytokines Plus various peripheral blood mononuclear cell populations. Skin incubated with interleukin 2 and granulocyte-macro-phage colony-stimulating factor induced a perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate, while control samples did not. Immunophenotypic analysis revealed that the lymphocytes were predominantly CD3+/CD4+. An infiltrate was not observed when skin was incubated with cytokines alone, without the addition of simultaneously isolated peripheral lymphocytes. A perivascular pattern was not observed with the addition of interferon gamma. Only interferon gamma induced keratinocyte intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression in experimental tissue. Certain cytokines that affect a range of cell types are capable of inducing a common cutaneous pattern, the perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate. References 1. Grimm EA, Mazumder A, Zhang HZ, Rosenberg SA. Lymphokine-activated killer cell phenomenon: lysis of natural killer-resistant fresh solid tumor cells by activated autologous human peripheral blood lymphocytes . J Exp Med . 1982;155:1823-1841.Crossref 2. Klingemann HG, Eaves AC, Barnett MJ, et al. Recombinant GM-CSF in patients with poor graft function after bone marrow transplantation . Clin Invest Med . 1990;13:77-81. 3. Horn TD, Burke PJ, Karp JE, Hood AF. Intravenous administration of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor causes a cutaneous eruption . Arch Dermatol . 1991;127:49-52.Crossref 4. Horn TD, Redd JV, Karp JE, Beschorner WE, Burke PJ, Hood AF. Cutaneous eruptions of lymphocyte recovery . Arch Dermatol . 1989;125:1512-1517.Crossref 5. Hood AF, Vogelsang GB, Black LP, Farmer ER, Santos GW. Acute graft-vs-host disease: development following autologous and syngeneic bone marrow transplantation . Arch Dermatol . 1987; 123:745-750.Crossref 6. Belanger R, Tutschka PJ, Beschorner WE, Hess AD, Santos GW. Acute graft-vs-host disease in recipients of syngeneic bone marrow . Exp Hematol . 1982;10( (suppl) ):23-32. 7. Jones RJ, Vogelsang GB, Hess AD, et al. Induction of graft-vs-host disease after autologous bone marrow transplantation . Lancet . 1989;1:754-757.Crossref 8. Horn TD, Kerker BJ, Karp JE, Burke PH, Hood AF. Endothelial expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is unaffected by marrow aplasia-inducing chemotherapy . J Cutan Pathol . 1991;18:36-39.Crossref 9. Vogelsang GB, Hess AD, Berkman AW, et al. An in vitro predictive test for graft versus host disease in patients with genotypic HLA-identical bone marrow transplants . N Engl J Med . 1985;313:645-650.Crossref 10. Beschorner WE, Farmer ER, Saral R, Stirling WL, Santos GW. Epithelial class II antigen expression in cutaneous graft-versus host disease . Transplantation . 1987;44:237-243.Crossref 11. Nickloff BJ, Reusch MA, Bensch K, Karasek MA. Preferential binding by monocytes and Leu 2 + lymphocytes to interferon gamma treated cultured skin endothelial cells and keratinocytes . Arch Dermatol Res . 1988;280:235-245.Crossref 12. Nickloff BJ. The role of gamma interferon in cutaneous trafficking of lymphocytes with emphasis on molecular and cellular adhesion events . Arch Dermatol . 1988;124:1835-1843.Crossref 13. Wong RL, Lingenheld EG, Fitzgerald L, Clark RB. Murine T helper cell clones secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GmCSF) by both interleukin-2-dependent and interleukin-2-independent pathways . Cell Immunol . 1989;123:445-455.Crossref 14. Kupper TS, Lee F, Coleman D, Chodakewitz J, Flood P, Horowitz M. Keratinocyte derived T-cell growth factor (KTGF) is identical to granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF) . J Invest Dermatol . 1988;91:185-188.Crossref 15. Willman CL, Stewart CC, Miller V, Yi T, Tomasi TB. Regulation of MHC class II gene expression in macrophages by hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors (CSF) . J Exp Med . 1989;170:1559-1567.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1991

References