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INTER-COMPLICATIONS OF NEURASTHENIA.

INTER-COMPLICATIONS OF NEURASTHENIA. Neurasthenia is an old term applied to a long recognized condition whose relations however have only been cleared of obscurity of late years. The older clinicians described it under the term "nervous adynamia," a peculiar condition of the entire organism most obviously improved and benefited by tonics. The nervous system is the first part visibly affected, the heart the second; the contractile heart fails not from want of blood as in anemia, but more directly as from a shock or some toxic influence. The capillary activity seems impaired, the metabolism and nutrition thereby declined, the contractile power of the heart and blood pressure being much diminished. This condition, which is essentially one of exhaustion, finally fixes itself, whatever be the primary cause, on the central nervous system and finds expression in a nervous instability taking the line of least resistance. It has been claimed that the condition is essentially one http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

INTER-COMPLICATIONS OF NEURASTHENIA.

JAMA , Volume XXIX (12) – Sep 18, 1897

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1897 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1897.02440380024002e
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Neurasthenia is an old term applied to a long recognized condition whose relations however have only been cleared of obscurity of late years. The older clinicians described it under the term "nervous adynamia," a peculiar condition of the entire organism most obviously improved and benefited by tonics. The nervous system is the first part visibly affected, the heart the second; the contractile heart fails not from want of blood as in anemia, but more directly as from a shock or some toxic influence. The capillary activity seems impaired, the metabolism and nutrition thereby declined, the contractile power of the heart and blood pressure being much diminished. This condition, which is essentially one of exhaustion, finally fixes itself, whatever be the primary cause, on the central nervous system and finds expression in a nervous instability taking the line of least resistance. It has been claimed that the condition is essentially one

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 18, 1897

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