Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Influenza Hits Poor People Hardest

Influenza Hits Poor People Hardest Illness has always had a disproportionate effect on poor populations, and now researchers have confirmed that severe influenza requiring hospitalization is more prevalent in impoverished neighborhoods nationwide. By linking influenza cases with the socioeconomic status of populations living in specific census tracts, the researchers went beyond routine public health surveillance data. They analyzed influenza hospitalization data from 14 Influenza Hospitalization Surveillance Network (FluSurv-NET) sites including 27 million people, or 9% of the US population. The data cover 2 flu seasons from 2010 to 2012 (Hadler JL et al. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016;65[5]:101-105). The age-adjusted incidence of influenza-related hospitalizations per 100 000 person-years in high poverty areas, where at least 20% of residents live below the federal poverty level, was 21.5—twice the rate as in neighborhoods where less than 5% of the population lived in poverty. The association between poverty and high influenza hospitalization rates was consistent regardless of geography, age, racial or ethnic background, or influenza season. Crowded living conditions and a higher prevalence of other medical conditions may account for greater numbers of impoverished people being hospitalized for severe influenza. The poorest hospitalized patients studied also had lower influenza vaccination rates—35%—compared with 48% of those living in the most affluent areas. By identifying unique demographic groups like poor people, who have more serious complications from influenza, local vaccination efforts can be better targeted and clinicians can be prepared to offer early antiviral therapy, the researchers wrote. News From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Section Editor: Rebecca Voelker, MSJ. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Influenza Hits Poor People Hardest

JAMA , Volume 315 (12) – Mar 22, 2016

Influenza Hits Poor People Hardest

Abstract

Illness has always had a disproportionate effect on poor populations, and now researchers have confirmed that severe influenza requiring hospitalization is more prevalent in impoverished neighborhoods nationwide. By linking influenza cases with the socioeconomic status of populations living in specific census tracts, the researchers went beyond routine public health surveillance data. They analyzed influenza hospitalization data from 14 Influenza Hospitalization Surveillance Network...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/influenza-hits-poor-people-hardest-OEolU0PedS
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2016.2405
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Illness has always had a disproportionate effect on poor populations, and now researchers have confirmed that severe influenza requiring hospitalization is more prevalent in impoverished neighborhoods nationwide. By linking influenza cases with the socioeconomic status of populations living in specific census tracts, the researchers went beyond routine public health surveillance data. They analyzed influenza hospitalization data from 14 Influenza Hospitalization Surveillance Network (FluSurv-NET) sites including 27 million people, or 9% of the US population. The data cover 2 flu seasons from 2010 to 2012 (Hadler JL et al. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016;65[5]:101-105). The age-adjusted incidence of influenza-related hospitalizations per 100 000 person-years in high poverty areas, where at least 20% of residents live below the federal poverty level, was 21.5—twice the rate as in neighborhoods where less than 5% of the population lived in poverty. The association between poverty and high influenza hospitalization rates was consistent regardless of geography, age, racial or ethnic background, or influenza season. Crowded living conditions and a higher prevalence of other medical conditions may account for greater numbers of impoverished people being hospitalized for severe influenza. The poorest hospitalized patients studied also had lower influenza vaccination rates—35%—compared with 48% of those living in the most affluent areas. By identifying unique demographic groups like poor people, who have more serious complications from influenza, local vaccination efforts can be better targeted and clinicians can be prepared to offer early antiviral therapy, the researchers wrote. News From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Section Editor: Rebecca Voelker, MSJ.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 22, 2016

Keywords: influenza,poverty,health disparity

There are no references for this article.