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Influence of the Wassermann Test on Pregnancy and Childbirth

Influence of the Wassermann Test on Pregnancy and Childbirth Abstract It was almost impossible to make a diagnosis of syphilis in the pregnant mother before Wassermann devised his serologic test for that disease. The great majority of such mothers do not have any signs or symptoms of syphilitic disease even when a most accurate history is taken and a searching physical examination is made. Since the history of syphilis in any family was hard to elicit because of the shame of having such a disease, it was not of much importance. In most instances the father would never admit that he had been afflicted with such a disease. This observation was not only true in the pregnant mother but it was true in nearly all syphilitic persons. Most persons suffering from syphilitic disease are in the state of latency most of their lives. There was no way of diagnosing this condition in the preWassermann References 1. Syphilitic serologic tests are not universally performed on the entire population. 2. Foreign substances were used in the Wassermann test. Only one, the syphilitic serum, was of human origin. The others were derived from animals. They included sheep R. B. C., beef or guinea pig heart, guinea pig blood, and rabbit serum. 3. Ingraham, N. R., Jr.: Complications Due to Arsenical Therapy in Syphilitic Pregnant Women , J. A. M. A. 112:1537 ( (April 22) ) 1939.Crossref 4. Dennie, C. C.; Morgan, D., and Drowns, B. V.: The Fate of the Adult Congenital Syphilitic, to be published. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Influence of the Wassermann Test on Pregnancy and Childbirth

A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology , Volume 73 (5) – May 1, 1956

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5359
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1956.01550050050007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract It was almost impossible to make a diagnosis of syphilis in the pregnant mother before Wassermann devised his serologic test for that disease. The great majority of such mothers do not have any signs or symptoms of syphilitic disease even when a most accurate history is taken and a searching physical examination is made. Since the history of syphilis in any family was hard to elicit because of the shame of having such a disease, it was not of much importance. In most instances the father would never admit that he had been afflicted with such a disease. This observation was not only true in the pregnant mother but it was true in nearly all syphilitic persons. Most persons suffering from syphilitic disease are in the state of latency most of their lives. There was no way of diagnosing this condition in the preWassermann References 1. Syphilitic serologic tests are not universally performed on the entire population. 2. Foreign substances were used in the Wassermann test. Only one, the syphilitic serum, was of human origin. The others were derived from animals. They included sheep R. B. C., beef or guinea pig heart, guinea pig blood, and rabbit serum. 3. Ingraham, N. R., Jr.: Complications Due to Arsenical Therapy in Syphilitic Pregnant Women , J. A. M. A. 112:1537 ( (April 22) ) 1939.Crossref 4. Dennie, C. C.; Morgan, D., and Drowns, B. V.: The Fate of the Adult Congenital Syphilitic, to be published.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1956

References