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Influence of Child Abuse on Adult Depression

Influence of Child Abuse on Adult Depression ORIGINAL ARTICLE Moderation by the Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Gene Rebekah G. Bradley, PhD; Elisabeth B. Binder, MD, PhD; Michael P. Epstein, PhD; Yilang Tang, PhD; Hemu P. Nair, PhD; Wei Liu, PhD; Charles F. Gillespie, MD, PhD; Tiina Berg, PhD; Mark Evces, PhD; D. Jeffrey Newport, MD; Zachary N. Stowe, MD; Christine M. Heim, PhD; Charles B. Nemeroff, MD, PhD; Ann Schwartz, MD; Joseph F. Cubells, MD, PhD; Kerry J. Ressler, MD, PhD Context: Genetic inheritance and developmental life ethnically (87.7% Caucasian) and socioeconomically (less stress both contribute to major depressive disorder in impoverished). adults. Child abuse and trauma alter the endogenous stress response, principally corticotropin-releasing hormone Main Outcome Measures: Beck Depression Inventory and its downstream effectors, suggesting that a scores and history of major depressive disorder by the Struc- gene environment interaction at this locus may be im- tured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders. portant in depression. Results: Fifteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms span- Objective: To examine whether the effects of child abuse ning 57 kilobases of the CRHR1 gene were examined. We on adult depressive symptoms are moderated by genetic found significant gene environment interactions with polymorphisms within the corticotropin-releasing hor- multiple individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms (eg, mone http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Psychiatry American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2008 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-622X
eISSN
2168-6238
DOI
10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2007.26
pmid
18250257
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Moderation by the Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Gene Rebekah G. Bradley, PhD; Elisabeth B. Binder, MD, PhD; Michael P. Epstein, PhD; Yilang Tang, PhD; Hemu P. Nair, PhD; Wei Liu, PhD; Charles F. Gillespie, MD, PhD; Tiina Berg, PhD; Mark Evces, PhD; D. Jeffrey Newport, MD; Zachary N. Stowe, MD; Christine M. Heim, PhD; Charles B. Nemeroff, MD, PhD; Ann Schwartz, MD; Joseph F. Cubells, MD, PhD; Kerry J. Ressler, MD, PhD Context: Genetic inheritance and developmental life ethnically (87.7% Caucasian) and socioeconomically (less stress both contribute to major depressive disorder in impoverished). adults. Child abuse and trauma alter the endogenous stress response, principally corticotropin-releasing hormone Main Outcome Measures: Beck Depression Inventory and its downstream effectors, suggesting that a scores and history of major depressive disorder by the Struc- gene environment interaction at this locus may be im- tured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders. portant in depression. Results: Fifteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms span- Objective: To examine whether the effects of child abuse ning 57 kilobases of the CRHR1 gene were examined. We on adult depressive symptoms are moderated by genetic found significant gene environment interactions with polymorphisms within the corticotropin-releasing hor- multiple individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms (eg, mone

Journal

JAMA PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 2008

References