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INFECTIONS OF THE MIDDLE EAR: ACUTE SYSTEMIC INFECTIONS FROM THE EAR

INFECTIONS OF THE MIDDLE EAR: ACUTE SYSTEMIC INFECTIONS FROM THE EAR Abstract It has always seemed to me that of all the problems presented in the practice of medicine those concerning general invasions of the system are by far the most interesting. Discounting the bias that may naturally be ascribed to me, I believe that the problems of general invasions of otitic origin are second to none in interest. This subject has many ramifications; for a number of years I have been concerned chiefly with the practical side. For a great deal of the data that I am presenting I must quote freely from Dr. Libman, who perhaps more than any other man in America has consistently contributed to the scientific aspect of this subject. I realize that perhaps this division with its attendant nomenclature may not be correct. I hope that it will not be offensive, but as it is obvious that the otologists bear the onus of this References 1. A bile-soluble Streptococcus mucosus, according to the old classification. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

INFECTIONS OF THE MIDDLE EAR: ACUTE SYSTEMIC INFECTIONS FROM THE EAR

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 14 (3) – Sep 1, 1931

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1931 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1931.00630020297001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract It has always seemed to me that of all the problems presented in the practice of medicine those concerning general invasions of the system are by far the most interesting. Discounting the bias that may naturally be ascribed to me, I believe that the problems of general invasions of otitic origin are second to none in interest. This subject has many ramifications; for a number of years I have been concerned chiefly with the practical side. For a great deal of the data that I am presenting I must quote freely from Dr. Libman, who perhaps more than any other man in America has consistently contributed to the scientific aspect of this subject. I realize that perhaps this division with its attendant nomenclature may not be correct. I hope that it will not be offensive, but as it is obvious that the otologists bear the onus of this References 1. A bile-soluble Streptococcus mucosus, according to the old classification.

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1931

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