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Infection Control Practices in Ambulatory Surgical Centers

Infection Control Practices in Ambulatory Surgical Centers Editorials represent the opinions EDITORIAL of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association. Infection Control Practices in Ambulatory Surgical Centers ject to the same regulatory requirements for Medicare Philip S. Barie, MD, MBA participation as inpatient facilities for similar services provided, most aspects of monitoring of regulatory com- INCE THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE FIRST AMBULA- pliance are left to individual states, and direct observa- tory surgical centers (ASCs) in 1970, the number tion has not been required. Reporting mechanisms of these facilities and the volume of procedures are disjointed and extant quality-related data are sparse, Sphysicians perform in them have increased particularly in the realm of postoperative infection. For substantially. In parallel, during this time, there has been instance, only 20 ASCs reported data to the National a marked shift to the outpatient setting for many Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) of the US Centers common, low-risk operations that do not require hospi- for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for 2006 talization or a postoperative stay of more than 24 hours. through 2008, compared with data reported by 1545 Since 1991, according to the Ambulatory Surgery Center hospitals. Association, more surgical procedures have been per- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Infection Control Practices in Ambulatory Surgical Centers

JAMA , Volume 303 (22) – Jun 9, 2010

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2010 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2010.760
pmid
20530786
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorials represent the opinions EDITORIAL of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association. Infection Control Practices in Ambulatory Surgical Centers ject to the same regulatory requirements for Medicare Philip S. Barie, MD, MBA participation as inpatient facilities for similar services provided, most aspects of monitoring of regulatory com- INCE THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE FIRST AMBULA- pliance are left to individual states, and direct observa- tory surgical centers (ASCs) in 1970, the number tion has not been required. Reporting mechanisms of these facilities and the volume of procedures are disjointed and extant quality-related data are sparse, Sphysicians perform in them have increased particularly in the realm of postoperative infection. For substantially. In parallel, during this time, there has been instance, only 20 ASCs reported data to the National a marked shift to the outpatient setting for many Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) of the US Centers common, low-risk operations that do not require hospi- for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for 2006 talization or a postoperative stay of more than 24 hours. through 2008, compared with data reported by 1545 Since 1991, according to the Ambulatory Surgery Center hospitals. Association, more surgical procedures have been per-

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 9, 2010

References