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INFECTION AS CAUSE OF FOLIC ACID DEFICIENCY AND MEGALOBLASTIC ANEMIA

INFECTION AS CAUSE OF FOLIC ACID DEFICIENCY AND MEGALOBLASTIC ANEMIA A SURVEY of histories of infants with megaloblastic anemia reveals that infection and ascorbic acid deficiency are common features of possible etiologic significance.1 A megaloblastic type of anemia usually implies a deficiency of vitamin B12 or folic (pteroylglutamic) acid compounds; so some relation of infection and ascorbic acid deficiency to the metabolism of these compounds might be anticipated. We have explored the relation of ascorbic acid deficiency to the development of folic acid deficiency, experimentally 2 and in megaloblastic anemia in infancy.3 All the evidence indicates that the requirement for folic acid is increased by a deficiency of ascorbic acid, especially when so severe as to lead to scurvy.4 This mechanism may be of importance in many infants with megaloblastic anemia, but in most infants megaloblastic anemia developed after a series of infections, even though the intake of ascorbic acid was unquestionably adequate. It is to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

INFECTION AS CAUSE OF FOLIC ACID DEFICIENCY AND MEGALOBLASTIC ANEMIA

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1952 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1952.02050060056004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A SURVEY of histories of infants with megaloblastic anemia reveals that infection and ascorbic acid deficiency are common features of possible etiologic significance.1 A megaloblastic type of anemia usually implies a deficiency of vitamin B12 or folic (pteroylglutamic) acid compounds; so some relation of infection and ascorbic acid deficiency to the metabolism of these compounds might be anticipated. We have explored the relation of ascorbic acid deficiency to the development of folic acid deficiency, experimentally 2 and in megaloblastic anemia in infancy.3 All the evidence indicates that the requirement for folic acid is increased by a deficiency of ascorbic acid, especially when so severe as to lead to scurvy.4 This mechanism may be of importance in many infants with megaloblastic anemia, but in most infants megaloblastic anemia developed after a series of infections, even though the intake of ascorbic acid was unquestionably adequate. It is to

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1952

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