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Infection and Prematurity as the Cause of Linear Skin Atrophy, Alopecia, Anonychia, and Tongue Lesions?

Infection and Prematurity as the Cause of Linear Skin Atrophy, Alopecia, Anonychia, and Tongue... Abstract To the Editor.— In the March 1985 issue of the Archives, Cohen et al1 described a patient (case 1) seen by us2 in the Division of Medical Genetics at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, as well as two additional patients with a similar disorder.It was our impression that the skin atrophy in our patient was the consequence of the healing of an early vesiculobullous eruption; this, in turn, would have been caused by either an intrauterine insult or congenital fragility of the connective tissue.3 The defect was found in one of monozygotic (MZ) twins (probability of monozygocity was.9998), strongly suggesting a nongenetic cause. Though a postzygotic, posttwinning mutation can explain discordance in MZ twins for genetic traits, the alternative theory of an intrauterine insult is clearly favored.It is of note that all three patients described by Cohen et al were premature and that gestational age seemed References 1. Cohen BA, Esterly NB, Nelson PF: Congenital erosive and vesicular dermatosis healing with reticulated supple scarring . Arch Dermatol 1985;121:361-367.Crossref 2. Sequeiros J, Sack GH: Linear skin atrophy, scarring alopecia, anonychia and tongue lesion: A new syndrome? Am J Med Genet 1985;21:669-680.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Infection and Prematurity as the Cause of Linear Skin Atrophy, Alopecia, Anonychia, and Tongue Lesions?

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 121 (11) – Nov 1, 1985

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1985.01660110027003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— In the March 1985 issue of the Archives, Cohen et al1 described a patient (case 1) seen by us2 in the Division of Medical Genetics at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, as well as two additional patients with a similar disorder.It was our impression that the skin atrophy in our patient was the consequence of the healing of an early vesiculobullous eruption; this, in turn, would have been caused by either an intrauterine insult or congenital fragility of the connective tissue.3 The defect was found in one of monozygotic (MZ) twins (probability of monozygocity was.9998), strongly suggesting a nongenetic cause. Though a postzygotic, posttwinning mutation can explain discordance in MZ twins for genetic traits, the alternative theory of an intrauterine insult is clearly favored.It is of note that all three patients described by Cohen et al were premature and that gestational age seemed References 1. Cohen BA, Esterly NB, Nelson PF: Congenital erosive and vesicular dermatosis healing with reticulated supple scarring . Arch Dermatol 1985;121:361-367.Crossref 2. Sequeiros J, Sack GH: Linear skin atrophy, scarring alopecia, anonychia and tongue lesion: A new syndrome? Am J Med Genet 1985;21:669-680.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1985

References