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INFANTILE PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS DUE TO AN UNUSUAL TYPE OF TUBERCLE BACILLUS

INFANTILE PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS DUE TO AN UNUSUAL TYPE OF TUBERCLE BACILLUS Virginia R. was born on Oct. 4, 1927. At birth, she weighed 7¾ pounds (3.5 Kg.). When examined, she was found to be normal in all respects. There was nothing unusual about her progress, except that she was weaned on the third day, and from then on was fed artificially. On discharge from the hospital at the end of the second week of life, she was gaining normally. When seen on November 8, at 5 weeks of age, she was found to have become pale, although her progress in weight had been good. There was some nasal discharge, and she was thought to have a cold. In all probability, these were the symptoms of the illness which was clearly demonstrated at the next visit, when she was 11 weeks of age. She then had a fever and a cough which had been noted three days before; the pallor had increased http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

INFANTILE PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS DUE TO AN UNUSUAL TYPE OF TUBERCLE BACILLUS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1930 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1930.01930180120012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Virginia R. was born on Oct. 4, 1927. At birth, she weighed 7¾ pounds (3.5 Kg.). When examined, she was found to be normal in all respects. There was nothing unusual about her progress, except that she was weaned on the third day, and from then on was fed artificially. On discharge from the hospital at the end of the second week of life, she was gaining normally. When seen on November 8, at 5 weeks of age, she was found to have become pale, although her progress in weight had been good. There was some nasal discharge, and she was thought to have a cold. In all probability, these were the symptoms of the illness which was clearly demonstrated at the next visit, when she was 11 weeks of age. She then had a fever and a cough which had been noted three days before; the pallor had increased

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1930

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