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INFANTILE PARALYSIS

INFANTILE PARALYSIS GENERAL STATEMENTS We now know that epidemic infantile paralysis is a result of an infective process produced by a specific virus which affects particularly the vessels of the meninges, leading to marked hyperemia, infiltration and inflammation, and to secondary involvement and degeneration of certain of the adjacent nerve-cells and fibers. The disease itself is a self-limited one, terminated by the production within the organism of antibodies to the specific virus. The duration of the acute symptoms may vary from several days to as many weeks, when they may end fatally or in complete recovery, or may be followed by the palsy of one or more muscles, dependent on the site and the extent of the nerve affection. The early paralysis is always of greater extent than the residual palsy, and is due apparently to pressure on nerve trunks by the edema and infiltration of the meninges. It is only after http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1911 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1911.04100080039005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

GENERAL STATEMENTS We now know that epidemic infantile paralysis is a result of an infective process produced by a specific virus which affects particularly the vessels of the meninges, leading to marked hyperemia, infiltration and inflammation, and to secondary involvement and degeneration of certain of the adjacent nerve-cells and fibers. The disease itself is a self-limited one, terminated by the production within the organism of antibodies to the specific virus. The duration of the acute symptoms may vary from several days to as many weeks, when they may end fatally or in complete recovery, or may be followed by the palsy of one or more muscles, dependent on the site and the extent of the nerve affection. The early paralysis is always of greater extent than the residual palsy, and is due apparently to pressure on nerve trunks by the edema and infiltration of the meninges. It is only after

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1911

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