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Induced Dermal Melanocytosis in Hairless Mice

Induced Dermal Melanocytosis in Hairless Mice Abstract Dermal melanocytosis is a natural state for many mammals. In the human primate, it appears only as a congenital or atavistic remnant in nevus fuscocaeruleus ophthalmomaxillaris of Ota, the mongolian spot, and in the blue nevus. Its development has been thought due to arrested migration of pigment cells, and this condition has not been regularly produced in human tissue by any means. Szabo1 has induced a similar condition in the mouse by painting with methylcholanthrene and croton oil. Rappaport and associates2 have induced an unusual tumor that they term a cellular blue nevus in Syrian hamsters by means of dibenzathracene. This is a report of our experience in the induction of the blue nevus in the skin of the hairless mouse. Method Six hairless mice were painted with gas-oil, a low-viscosity heating fuel, and exposed to ultraviolet irradiation daily. The ultraviolet source was the H85-C3 General Electric bulb, References 1. Szabo, G.: The Effect of Carcinogens on Melanocytes, in Proceedings of the Fifth International Pigment Cell Conference , New York, (October) , 1961. 2. Rappaport, H.; Pietra, G., and Shubik, P.: The Induction of Melanotic Tumors Resembling Cellular Blue Nevi in the Syrian White Hamster by Cutaneous Application of 7,12-Dimethylbenz[α]-Anthracene , Cancer Res. 21:661-666 ( (June) ) 1961. 3. Winkelmann, R. K.; Baldes, E. J., and Zollman, P. E.: Squamous Cell Tumors Induced in Hairless Mice with Ultraviolet Light , J. Invest. Derm. 34:131-138 ( (Feb.) ) 1960. 4. Slepyan, A. H.: Personal communication to the authors. 5. Kopf, A. W., and Weidman, A. I.: Nevus of Ota , Arch. Derm. 85:195-208 ( (Feb.) ) 1962.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Induced Dermal Melanocytosis in Hairless Mice

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 86 (2) – Aug 1, 1962

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1962 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1962.01590080099014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Dermal melanocytosis is a natural state for many mammals. In the human primate, it appears only as a congenital or atavistic remnant in nevus fuscocaeruleus ophthalmomaxillaris of Ota, the mongolian spot, and in the blue nevus. Its development has been thought due to arrested migration of pigment cells, and this condition has not been regularly produced in human tissue by any means. Szabo1 has induced a similar condition in the mouse by painting with methylcholanthrene and croton oil. Rappaport and associates2 have induced an unusual tumor that they term a cellular blue nevus in Syrian hamsters by means of dibenzathracene. This is a report of our experience in the induction of the blue nevus in the skin of the hairless mouse. Method Six hairless mice were painted with gas-oil, a low-viscosity heating fuel, and exposed to ultraviolet irradiation daily. The ultraviolet source was the H85-C3 General Electric bulb, References 1. Szabo, G.: The Effect of Carcinogens on Melanocytes, in Proceedings of the Fifth International Pigment Cell Conference , New York, (October) , 1961. 2. Rappaport, H.; Pietra, G., and Shubik, P.: The Induction of Melanotic Tumors Resembling Cellular Blue Nevi in the Syrian White Hamster by Cutaneous Application of 7,12-Dimethylbenz[α]-Anthracene , Cancer Res. 21:661-666 ( (June) ) 1961. 3. Winkelmann, R. K.; Baldes, E. J., and Zollman, P. E.: Squamous Cell Tumors Induced in Hairless Mice with Ultraviolet Light , J. Invest. Derm. 34:131-138 ( (Feb.) ) 1960. 4. Slepyan, A. H.: Personal communication to the authors. 5. Kopf, A. W., and Weidman, A. I.: Nevus of Ota , Arch. Derm. 85:195-208 ( (Feb.) ) 1962.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1962

References

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