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INDICATIONS THAT MONGOLOID IMBECILITY IS A GAMETIC MUTATION OF DEGRESSIVE TYPE

INDICATIONS THAT MONGOLOID IMBECILITY IS A GAMETIC MUTATION OF DEGRESSIVE TYPE Whether a mutation, even a degressive mutation, the result of a disturbance in the biologic order at the beginning of life, with its inevitable limitation of function as well as change in anatomy, may constitute disease may be open to question. The term is used in this paper chiefly because of its convenience, although I believe that any pathologic syndrome such as mongolism is in fact a "departure from health," which is the definition of disease commonly found in modern dictionaries.1 THREE SIGNS OF MONGOLISM Figure 1 shows the astonishing elasticity of the skin in mongolism. The added peculiarity of redundancy makes it a useful sign of this disease. This combination is often best appreciated in the neck, especially the back of the neck, where the folds with their familiar feel may be grasped and lifted away from the underlying muscles. The soft skin of the mongoloid imbecile, its http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

INDICATIONS THAT MONGOLOID IMBECILITY IS A GAMETIC MUTATION OF DEGRESSIVE TYPE

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1934 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1934.01960090083006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Whether a mutation, even a degressive mutation, the result of a disturbance in the biologic order at the beginning of life, with its inevitable limitation of function as well as change in anatomy, may constitute disease may be open to question. The term is used in this paper chiefly because of its convenience, although I believe that any pathologic syndrome such as mongolism is in fact a "departure from health," which is the definition of disease commonly found in modern dictionaries.1 THREE SIGNS OF MONGOLISM Figure 1 shows the astonishing elasticity of the skin in mongolism. The added peculiarity of redundancy makes it a useful sign of this disease. This combination is often best appreciated in the neck, especially the back of the neck, where the folds with their familiar feel may be grasped and lifted away from the underlying muscles. The soft skin of the mongoloid imbecile, its

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1934

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