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IMPROVEMENT OF LOW-TONE DEAFNESS AND TINNITUS BY MANDIBULAR REPOSITIONING

IMPROVEMENT OF LOW-TONE DEAFNESS AND TINNITUS BY MANDIBULAR REPOSITIONING Abstract IN AN ARTICLE written some time ago on mandibular repositioning in obstructive deafness and tinnitus, I1 advanced the theory that the genetic relationship of the musculature of the mandible, the auditory tube, and the middle ear may be a causative factor. In that article I stated that in the embryo the oral cavity is not distinctly separated from the pharynx, Eustachian tube, and middle ear. The nasopharynx and the nasal cavity become distinct when the palate is formed. The middle ear, Eustachian tube, pharynx, and mouth are lined with mucous membrane. This fact is directly related to the developmental relations of the parts, since the middle ear may be considered a partially separated portion of the pharynx and mouth. In the embryo is also found the pterygoid mass, which splits as the embryo develops. It finally becomes three distinct muscles. The main bulk of the pterygoid mass becomes the References 1. Ronkin, S. H.: Repositioning Mandible in Cases of Obstructive (Low Tone) Deafness and Tinnitus , A. M. A. Arch. Otolaryng. 54:632, 1951.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

IMPROVEMENT OF LOW-TONE DEAFNESS AND TINNITUS BY MANDIBULAR REPOSITIONING

A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 57 (6) – Jun 1, 1953

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1953 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6894
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1953.00710030693008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract IN AN ARTICLE written some time ago on mandibular repositioning in obstructive deafness and tinnitus, I1 advanced the theory that the genetic relationship of the musculature of the mandible, the auditory tube, and the middle ear may be a causative factor. In that article I stated that in the embryo the oral cavity is not distinctly separated from the pharynx, Eustachian tube, and middle ear. The nasopharynx and the nasal cavity become distinct when the palate is formed. The middle ear, Eustachian tube, pharynx, and mouth are lined with mucous membrane. This fact is directly related to the developmental relations of the parts, since the middle ear may be considered a partially separated portion of the pharynx and mouth. In the embryo is also found the pterygoid mass, which splits as the embryo develops. It finally becomes three distinct muscles. The main bulk of the pterygoid mass becomes the References 1. Ronkin, S. H.: Repositioning Mandible in Cases of Obstructive (Low Tone) Deafness and Tinnitus , A. M. A. Arch. Otolaryng. 54:632, 1951.Crossref

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1953

References