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Improved Survival After Intraoperative Cardiac Arrest in Noncardiac Surgical Patients

Improved Survival After Intraoperative Cardiac Arrest in Noncardiac Surgical Patients Abstract The article "Improved Survival After Intraoperative Cardiac Arrest in Noncardiac Surgical Patients" by Girardi and Barie1 in the January issue of the Archives is a worthwhile addition to the few articles on the subject that address the issue via a survey of large numbers of cases from a single institution over a relatively long time span.2 The Invited Commentary by Flint3 overlooks the fact that, after correction for type of operation, the ratio of cardiac arrest to number of operations has not changed appreciably over the last 35 or 40 years. The central problem is that while anesthetic agents and adjuvant drugs have changed, one invariant has remained, the so-called anesthesia record. Although it is true that during anesthesia one observes the patient, important decisions are not made on the basis of any one instantaneous observation but rather on the basis of the information accrued from the References 1. Girardi LN, Barie PS. Improved survival after intraoperative cardiac arrest in noncardiac surgical patients . Arch Surg . 1995;130:15-18.Crossref 2. Boba A. Death in the Operating Roam . Springfield, Ill: Charles C Thomas Publisher; 1965. 3. Flint F. Invited commentary . Arch Surg . 1995;130:19.Crossref 4. Boba A. Blood pressure changes during anesthesia (general considerations and observational data about the amplitude and the frequency of the signal) . Anesthesiology . 1982;57:A449. Abstract.Crossref 5. Weitzner S. European 'workstation' rules will influence US anesthesia machines . Anesth Patient Safety Found Newsletter . 1992;7:1-6. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Improved Survival After Intraoperative Cardiac Arrest in Noncardiac Surgical Patients

Archives of Surgery , Volume 130 (5) – May 1, 1995

Improved Survival After Intraoperative Cardiac Arrest in Noncardiac Surgical Patients

Abstract

Abstract The article "Improved Survival After Intraoperative Cardiac Arrest in Noncardiac Surgical Patients" by Girardi and Barie1 in the January issue of the Archives is a worthwhile addition to the few articles on the subject that address the issue via a survey of large numbers of cases from a single institution over a relatively long time span.2 The Invited Commentary by Flint3 overlooks the fact that, after correction for type of operation, the ratio of cardiac arrest to number...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1995.01430050110020
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The article "Improved Survival After Intraoperative Cardiac Arrest in Noncardiac Surgical Patients" by Girardi and Barie1 in the January issue of the Archives is a worthwhile addition to the few articles on the subject that address the issue via a survey of large numbers of cases from a single institution over a relatively long time span.2 The Invited Commentary by Flint3 overlooks the fact that, after correction for type of operation, the ratio of cardiac arrest to number of operations has not changed appreciably over the last 35 or 40 years. The central problem is that while anesthetic agents and adjuvant drugs have changed, one invariant has remained, the so-called anesthesia record. Although it is true that during anesthesia one observes the patient, important decisions are not made on the basis of any one instantaneous observation but rather on the basis of the information accrued from the References 1. Girardi LN, Barie PS. Improved survival after intraoperative cardiac arrest in noncardiac surgical patients . Arch Surg . 1995;130:15-18.Crossref 2. Boba A. Death in the Operating Roam . Springfield, Ill: Charles C Thomas Publisher; 1965. 3. Flint F. Invited commentary . Arch Surg . 1995;130:19.Crossref 4. Boba A. Blood pressure changes during anesthesia (general considerations and observational data about the amplitude and the frequency of the signal) . Anesthesiology . 1982;57:A449. Abstract.Crossref 5. Weitzner S. European 'workstation' rules will influence US anesthesia machines . Anesth Patient Safety Found Newsletter . 1992;7:1-6.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1995

References