Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

If You Don't Know

If You Don't Know Abstract No one will deny that the logical aphorism, "If you don't know, you don't know," is true. Yet, in medicine we traditionally make assumptions and act accordingly when we do not know the underlying problem with certainty. If the patient's condition improves, our "clinical judgment" was correct; if not, we alter the therapy. In many clinical situations this type of deductive therapy is effective, since time exists to allow for trial and error. In these cases, studies involving invasive methods are not necessary. However, in critically ill patients, reliance on symptoms and signs to identify abnormal cardiorespiratory patterns may lead to wrong conclusions and do the patient a real disservice. In them, time is not available to alter therapy after failure becomes fully apparent. Critically ill patients with incipient or actual multiple organ-systems failure have little tolerance to anything but prompt, proper therapy. Wrong assumptions that can lead to incorrect References 1. Berk JL: Monitoring the patient in shock: What, when, and how . Surg Clin North Am 55:713-720, 1975. 2. Swan HJC, Ganz W: Use of balloon flotation catheters in critically ill patients . Surg Clin North Am 55:501-520, 1975. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

If You Don't Know

Archives of Surgery , Volume 112 (1) – Jan 1, 1977

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/if-you-don-t-know-55SiI0zVUW
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1977 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1977.01370010019003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract No one will deny that the logical aphorism, "If you don't know, you don't know," is true. Yet, in medicine we traditionally make assumptions and act accordingly when we do not know the underlying problem with certainty. If the patient's condition improves, our "clinical judgment" was correct; if not, we alter the therapy. In many clinical situations this type of deductive therapy is effective, since time exists to allow for trial and error. In these cases, studies involving invasive methods are not necessary. However, in critically ill patients, reliance on symptoms and signs to identify abnormal cardiorespiratory patterns may lead to wrong conclusions and do the patient a real disservice. In them, time is not available to alter therapy after failure becomes fully apparent. Critically ill patients with incipient or actual multiple organ-systems failure have little tolerance to anything but prompt, proper therapy. Wrong assumptions that can lead to incorrect References 1. Berk JL: Monitoring the patient in shock: What, when, and how . Surg Clin North Am 55:713-720, 1975. 2. Swan HJC, Ganz W: Use of balloon flotation catheters in critically ill patients . Surg Clin North Am 55:501-520, 1975.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1977

References