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Hypoventilation in Acquired Micrognathia

Hypoventilation in Acquired Micrognathia Abstract MICROGNATHIA, an extreme underdevelopment of the mandible, occurs in agenesis of the condyles and in resorption of dislocated or ankylosed condyles due to fractures or local infections in early life.1 When symmetrical, it often produces retrusion of the chin, which imparts a characteristic bird-like appearance to the face. The congenital form often presents as a respiratory emergency in a newborn infant, since the condition is associated with glossoptosis and nasopharyngeal airway obstruction—a combination also known as the Pierre Robin syndrome.2 Respiratory embarrassment, acute or chronic, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported in association with acquired micrognathia. The following case record presents such a patient with chronic traumatic micrognathia complicated many years later by progressive respiratory failure. Report of Case A 55-year-old Arab man was admitted to the Medical Department on April 23, 1963, complaining of an excessive tendency to fall asleep day and night. References 1. Thoma, K. H.: Oral Surgery , St. Louis: The C. V. Mosby Co., 1963. 2. Robin, P.: Backward Displacement of Tongue Considered as New Cause of Nasopharyngeal Respiratory Difficulty , Bull Acad Med Paris 89:37, 1923. 3. Clinical Spirometry: Recommendations of the Section on Pulmonary Function Testing, American College of Chest Physicians , Dis Chest 43:214, 1963.Crossref 4. Baldwin, E. DeF.; Cournand, A.; and Richards, D. W., Jr.: Pulmonary Insufficiency: I. Physiological Classification, Clinical Methods of Analysis, Standard Values of Normal Subjects , Medicine 27:243, 1948. 5. Valero, A.; Stein, A.; and Peled, B.: Ventilatory Response to CO2 by Simple Rebreathing Test: Analysis of 100 Normal and Pathological Cases, unpublished data. 6. Cottle, M. H.: Concepts of Nasal Physiology as Related to Corrective Nasal Surgery , Arch Otolaryng 72:11, 1960.Crossref 7. Cherniack, R. M., and Snidal, D. P.: Effect of Obstruction to Breathing on Ventilatory Response to CO2 , J Clin Invest 35:1286, 1956.Crossref 8. Motley, H. L., and Valero, A.: Ratio of Residual Air to Total Lung Capacity , Fed Proc 14:104, 1955. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Hypoventilation in Acquired Micrognathia

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 115 (3) – Mar 1, 1965

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1965 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1965.03860150051009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract MICROGNATHIA, an extreme underdevelopment of the mandible, occurs in agenesis of the condyles and in resorption of dislocated or ankylosed condyles due to fractures or local infections in early life.1 When symmetrical, it often produces retrusion of the chin, which imparts a characteristic bird-like appearance to the face. The congenital form often presents as a respiratory emergency in a newborn infant, since the condition is associated with glossoptosis and nasopharyngeal airway obstruction—a combination also known as the Pierre Robin syndrome.2 Respiratory embarrassment, acute or chronic, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported in association with acquired micrognathia. The following case record presents such a patient with chronic traumatic micrognathia complicated many years later by progressive respiratory failure. Report of Case A 55-year-old Arab man was admitted to the Medical Department on April 23, 1963, complaining of an excessive tendency to fall asleep day and night. References 1. Thoma, K. H.: Oral Surgery , St. Louis: The C. V. Mosby Co., 1963. 2. Robin, P.: Backward Displacement of Tongue Considered as New Cause of Nasopharyngeal Respiratory Difficulty , Bull Acad Med Paris 89:37, 1923. 3. Clinical Spirometry: Recommendations of the Section on Pulmonary Function Testing, American College of Chest Physicians , Dis Chest 43:214, 1963.Crossref 4. Baldwin, E. DeF.; Cournand, A.; and Richards, D. W., Jr.: Pulmonary Insufficiency: I. Physiological Classification, Clinical Methods of Analysis, Standard Values of Normal Subjects , Medicine 27:243, 1948. 5. Valero, A.; Stein, A.; and Peled, B.: Ventilatory Response to CO2 by Simple Rebreathing Test: Analysis of 100 Normal and Pathological Cases, unpublished data. 6. Cottle, M. H.: Concepts of Nasal Physiology as Related to Corrective Nasal Surgery , Arch Otolaryng 72:11, 1960.Crossref 7. Cherniack, R. M., and Snidal, D. P.: Effect of Obstruction to Breathing on Ventilatory Response to CO2 , J Clin Invest 35:1286, 1956.Crossref 8. Motley, H. L., and Valero, A.: Ratio of Residual Air to Total Lung Capacity , Fed Proc 14:104, 1955.

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1965

References