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Hypothenar Dimpling: A Peripheral Equivalent of Hemifacial Spasm?

Hypothenar Dimpling: A Peripheral Equivalent of Hemifacial Spasm? Abstract • In two patients, the skin over both hypothenar eminences underwent intermittent, spontaneous, irregular, dimpling contractions. The dimpling was benign, and was the result of spontaneous discharge of motor units in the palmaris brevis muscle. Electrophysiological investigations localized the site of origin of the discharge to the ulnar nerve, possibly at the wrist, but there was no clinical or physiological evidence of neuropathy or of nerve compression. In many respects, the clinical and electrophysiological features of hypothenar dimpling resemble hemifacial spasm. References 1. Isaacs H: Syndrome of continuous muscle fiber activity . J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 24:319-325, 1961.Crossref 2. Wallis WE, Van Poznak A, Plum F: Generalized muscular stiffness, fasciculations, and myokymia of peripheral nerve origin . Arch Neurol 22:430-439, 1970.Crossref 3. Hemifacial spasm , editorial. Br Med J 4:624-625, 1972. 4. Ehni G, Woltman H: Hemifacial spasm: Review of 106 cases . Arch Neurol Psychiatry 53:205-211, 1945.Crossref 5. Gardner WJ, Sava GA: Hemifacial spasm: A reversible pathophysiologic state . J Neurosurg 19:240-247, 1962.Crossref 6. Eckman PB, Kramer RA, Altrocchi PH: Hemifacial spasm . Arch Neurol 25:81-87, 1971.Crossref 7. Hjorth RJ, Willison RG: The electromyogram in facial myokymia and hemifacial spasm . J Neurol Sci 20:117-126, 1973.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

Hypothenar Dimpling: A Peripheral Equivalent of Hemifacial Spasm?

Archives of Neurology , Volume 33 (10) – Oct 1, 1976

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1976 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.1976.00500100040013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • In two patients, the skin over both hypothenar eminences underwent intermittent, spontaneous, irregular, dimpling contractions. The dimpling was benign, and was the result of spontaneous discharge of motor units in the palmaris brevis muscle. Electrophysiological investigations localized the site of origin of the discharge to the ulnar nerve, possibly at the wrist, but there was no clinical or physiological evidence of neuropathy or of nerve compression. In many respects, the clinical and electrophysiological features of hypothenar dimpling resemble hemifacial spasm. References 1. Isaacs H: Syndrome of continuous muscle fiber activity . J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 24:319-325, 1961.Crossref 2. Wallis WE, Van Poznak A, Plum F: Generalized muscular stiffness, fasciculations, and myokymia of peripheral nerve origin . Arch Neurol 22:430-439, 1970.Crossref 3. Hemifacial spasm , editorial. Br Med J 4:624-625, 1972. 4. Ehni G, Woltman H: Hemifacial spasm: Review of 106 cases . Arch Neurol Psychiatry 53:205-211, 1945.Crossref 5. Gardner WJ, Sava GA: Hemifacial spasm: A reversible pathophysiologic state . J Neurosurg 19:240-247, 1962.Crossref 6. Eckman PB, Kramer RA, Altrocchi PH: Hemifacial spasm . Arch Neurol 25:81-87, 1971.Crossref 7. Hjorth RJ, Willison RG: The electromyogram in facial myokymia and hemifacial spasm . J Neurol Sci 20:117-126, 1973.Crossref

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1976

References