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Hypertrophic Scarring as a Complication of Fluorouracil Therapy

Hypertrophic Scarring as a Complication of Fluorouracil Therapy Abstract Scarring is an uncommon accompaniment to fluorouracil therapy of superficial erythematous basal cell carcinoma,1 When scarring occurs, it typically appears as mild atrophy.2 We could find no previous reports of hypertrophic scarring complicating fluorouracil therapy of superficial erythematous basal cell carcinoma, and present the following case. Report of a Case A 42-year-old man initially came to the Dermatology Clinic, University of California Medical Center, San Diego, in June 1978 with an 18-month history of a skin lesion on the left side of the upper part of the back. There was no history of previous trauma, skin cancer, or arsenic or x-ray exposure. The patient had sporadically treated the lesion with tolnaftate cream without response.Physical examination revealed a 2.5 × 2.0-cm erythematous, slightly raised plaque with fine scaling in the above site (Fig 1). An examination for fungi using potassium hydroxide was negative.A tentative diagnosis of nummular References 1. Klein E, Stoll HL, Milgrom H, et al: Tumors of the skin: XII. Topical 5-fluorouracil for epidermal neoplasms . J Surg Oncol 3:331-349, 1971.Crossref 2. Klein E, Stoll HL, Milgrom H, et al: Tumors of the skin: V. Local administration of anti-tumor agents to multiple superficial basal cell carcinomas . J Invest Dermatol 45:489-497, 1965.Crossref 3. Dillaha CJ, Jansen GT, Honeycutt WM, et al: Selective cytotoxic effect of topical 5-fluorouracil . Arch Dermatol 88:247-256, 1963.Crossref 4. Goette DK, Odom RB, Owens R: Allergic contact dermatitis from topical fluorouracil . Arch Dermatol 113:196-198, 1977.Crossref 5. Burnett JW: Two unusual complications of topical fluorouracil therapy . Arch Dermatol 111:398, 1975.Crossref 6. Bart BJ, Bean SF: Bullous pemphigoid following the topical use of fluorouracil . Arch Dermatol 102:457-460, 1970.Crossref 7. Dillaha CJ, Jansen GT, Honeycutt WM, et al: Further studies with topical 5-fluorouracil . Arch Dermatol 92:410-416, 1965.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Hypertrophic Scarring as a Complication of Fluorouracil Therapy

Hypertrophic Scarring as a Complication of Fluorouracil Therapy

Abstract

Abstract Scarring is an uncommon accompaniment to fluorouracil therapy of superficial erythematous basal cell carcinoma,1 When scarring occurs, it typically appears as mild atrophy.2 We could find no previous reports of hypertrophic scarring complicating fluorouracil therapy of superficial erythematous basal cell carcinoma, and present the following case. Report of a Case A 42-year-old man initially came to the Dermatology Clinic, University of California Medical Center, San Diego, in June...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1979 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1979.04010120048021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Scarring is an uncommon accompaniment to fluorouracil therapy of superficial erythematous basal cell carcinoma,1 When scarring occurs, it typically appears as mild atrophy.2 We could find no previous reports of hypertrophic scarring complicating fluorouracil therapy of superficial erythematous basal cell carcinoma, and present the following case. Report of a Case A 42-year-old man initially came to the Dermatology Clinic, University of California Medical Center, San Diego, in June 1978 with an 18-month history of a skin lesion on the left side of the upper part of the back. There was no history of previous trauma, skin cancer, or arsenic or x-ray exposure. The patient had sporadically treated the lesion with tolnaftate cream without response.Physical examination revealed a 2.5 × 2.0-cm erythematous, slightly raised plaque with fine scaling in the above site (Fig 1). An examination for fungi using potassium hydroxide was negative.A tentative diagnosis of nummular References 1. Klein E, Stoll HL, Milgrom H, et al: Tumors of the skin: XII. Topical 5-fluorouracil for epidermal neoplasms . J Surg Oncol 3:331-349, 1971.Crossref 2. Klein E, Stoll HL, Milgrom H, et al: Tumors of the skin: V. Local administration of anti-tumor agents to multiple superficial basal cell carcinomas . J Invest Dermatol 45:489-497, 1965.Crossref 3. Dillaha CJ, Jansen GT, Honeycutt WM, et al: Selective cytotoxic effect of topical 5-fluorouracil . Arch Dermatol 88:247-256, 1963.Crossref 4. Goette DK, Odom RB, Owens R: Allergic contact dermatitis from topical fluorouracil . Arch Dermatol 113:196-198, 1977.Crossref 5. Burnett JW: Two unusual complications of topical fluorouracil therapy . Arch Dermatol 111:398, 1975.Crossref 6. Bart BJ, Bean SF: Bullous pemphigoid following the topical use of fluorouracil . Arch Dermatol 102:457-460, 1970.Crossref 7. Dillaha CJ, Jansen GT, Honeycutt WM, et al: Further studies with topical 5-fluorouracil . Arch Dermatol 92:410-416, 1965.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1979

References