Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy in Southwestern Navajo Indians

Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy in Southwestern Navajo Indians Abstract Background: The Navajos are the largest Native American tribe. They, like other Native Americans, appear to be in an "epidemiologic transition" and are accordingly experiencing increased rates of hypertension, diabetes, and obesity. Methods: A retrospective chart review of all pregnancies in 1991 at the Crownpoint Indian Health Service Facility in Crownpoint, NM, was conducted to determine the prevalence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in this Navajo population. Results: Seventy-five (12.6%) of 594 pregnancies were associated with a hypertensive disorder. There were 18 individuals who developed gestational hypertension and 10 individuals with chronic hypertension that persisted during pregnancy. There were 46 women (7.7%) who developed preeclampsia and one woman (0.3%) who developed eclampsia. Eight women (1.4%) with chronic hypertension developed superimposed preeclampsia during pregnancy. Thus, 12.3% of these pregnancies in Navajo women were associated with the development of, or worsening, hypertension, and there was a prevalence of preeclampsia of 9.1%. Conclusion: The Navajos exhibit a high prevalence of pregnancy-related hypertension and preeclampsia.(Arch Intern Med. 1994;154:2181-2183) References 1. D'Angelo AJ. Navajo Area Key Statistics: March 1991 . Rockville, Md: Indian Health Service, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Legislation, Division of Program Statistics; 1991. 2. Sugarman JR. Prevalence of diagnosed hypertension among diabetic Navajo Indians . Arch Intern Med. 1990;150:359-362.Crossref 3. Salsbury CG. Disease incidence among Navajos . Southwest Med. 1937;21: 230-233. 4. Sievers ML. Historical overview of hypertension among American Indians and Alaskan Natives . Ariz Med. 1977;34:607-610. 5. Young TK. Prevalence and correlates of hypertension in a subarctic Indian population . Prev Med. 1991;20:474-485.Crossref 6. Broussard BA, Johnson A, Himes JH, et al. Prevalence of obesity in American Indians and Alaskan Natives . Am J Clin Nutr. 1991;53( (suppl) ):1535-S1542S. 7. Indian Health Service Area Population Estimates and Projections, 1980-2010 . Rockville, Md: Demographic Statistics Branch, Division of Program Statistics, Dept of Health and Human Services, Indian Health Service; 1990. 8. Navajo Area Indian Health Service. In: Navajo Health Status Summary . Window Rock, Ariz: Office of Program Planning and Evaluation, Navajo Area Indian Health Service; 1992. 9. Rhoades ER, Singyke R, Marshland RA. Indian Health Service: Regional Differences in Indian Health; 1990 . Rockville, Md: US Dept of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Indian Health Service; 1990. 10. Lindheimer MD, Katz AL. Hypertension in pregnancy . N Engl J Med. 1985; 313:675-680.Crossref 11. Eskenazi B, Fenster L, Sidney S. A multivariant analysis of risk factors for preeclampsia . JAMA. 1991;266:237-241.Crossref 12. Sowers JR, Standley PR, Ram JL, Jacober S, Simpson L, Rose K. Hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia: contributing factors in the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis . Am J Hypertens. 1993;6:260S-270S.Crossref 13. Sowers JR, Standley PR, Jacober S, Niyogi T, Simpson L. Postpartum abnormalities of carbohydrate metabolism in pregnancy induced hypertension . Am J Hypertens. 1991;6:302-307.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy in Southwestern Navajo Indians

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/hypertensive-disorders-of-pregnancy-in-southwestern-navajo-indians-ZqFYO9jUOB
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1994.00420190080009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Background: The Navajos are the largest Native American tribe. They, like other Native Americans, appear to be in an "epidemiologic transition" and are accordingly experiencing increased rates of hypertension, diabetes, and obesity. Methods: A retrospective chart review of all pregnancies in 1991 at the Crownpoint Indian Health Service Facility in Crownpoint, NM, was conducted to determine the prevalence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in this Navajo population. Results: Seventy-five (12.6%) of 594 pregnancies were associated with a hypertensive disorder. There were 18 individuals who developed gestational hypertension and 10 individuals with chronic hypertension that persisted during pregnancy. There were 46 women (7.7%) who developed preeclampsia and one woman (0.3%) who developed eclampsia. Eight women (1.4%) with chronic hypertension developed superimposed preeclampsia during pregnancy. Thus, 12.3% of these pregnancies in Navajo women were associated with the development of, or worsening, hypertension, and there was a prevalence of preeclampsia of 9.1%. Conclusion: The Navajos exhibit a high prevalence of pregnancy-related hypertension and preeclampsia.(Arch Intern Med. 1994;154:2181-2183) References 1. D'Angelo AJ. Navajo Area Key Statistics: March 1991 . Rockville, Md: Indian Health Service, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Legislation, Division of Program Statistics; 1991. 2. Sugarman JR. Prevalence of diagnosed hypertension among diabetic Navajo Indians . Arch Intern Med. 1990;150:359-362.Crossref 3. Salsbury CG. Disease incidence among Navajos . Southwest Med. 1937;21: 230-233. 4. Sievers ML. Historical overview of hypertension among American Indians and Alaskan Natives . Ariz Med. 1977;34:607-610. 5. Young TK. Prevalence and correlates of hypertension in a subarctic Indian population . Prev Med. 1991;20:474-485.Crossref 6. Broussard BA, Johnson A, Himes JH, et al. Prevalence of obesity in American Indians and Alaskan Natives . Am J Clin Nutr. 1991;53( (suppl) ):1535-S1542S. 7. Indian Health Service Area Population Estimates and Projections, 1980-2010 . Rockville, Md: Demographic Statistics Branch, Division of Program Statistics, Dept of Health and Human Services, Indian Health Service; 1990. 8. Navajo Area Indian Health Service. In: Navajo Health Status Summary . Window Rock, Ariz: Office of Program Planning and Evaluation, Navajo Area Indian Health Service; 1992. 9. Rhoades ER, Singyke R, Marshland RA. Indian Health Service: Regional Differences in Indian Health; 1990 . Rockville, Md: US Dept of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Indian Health Service; 1990. 10. Lindheimer MD, Katz AL. Hypertension in pregnancy . N Engl J Med. 1985; 313:675-680.Crossref 11. Eskenazi B, Fenster L, Sidney S. A multivariant analysis of risk factors for preeclampsia . JAMA. 1991;266:237-241.Crossref 12. Sowers JR, Standley PR, Ram JL, Jacober S, Simpson L, Rose K. Hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia: contributing factors in the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis . Am J Hypertens. 1993;6:260S-270S.Crossref 13. Sowers JR, Standley PR, Jacober S, Niyogi T, Simpson L. Postpartum abnormalities of carbohydrate metabolism in pregnancy induced hypertension . Am J Hypertens. 1991;6:302-307.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 10, 1994

References