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HYPERTENSION IN THE YOUNG

HYPERTENSION IN THE YOUNG Neither textbooks nor more comprehensive works on diseases of children have much to say about hypertension. Hecht,1 in Pfaundler and Schlossman's Handbook on Diseases of Children, remarked: "Lasting increase of blood pressure is found particularly in cases of chronic nephritis, but also in scarlet fever nephritis after a few days. A further increase of blood pressure is often a precursor of uremia." A number of children with increased blood pressure, ranging in age from 6 to 16 years, was examined and treated at the Mayo Clinic during a period of about eight years. The progress of the disease after dismissal could not always be ascertained, with the exception of a few recent reports, and necropsies were not obtained. Nevertheless, the twenty-five cases serving as a basis for this report offer features of significance. According to Judson and Nicholson,2 and Faber and James,3 the systolic blood pressure does http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1929 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1929.01930020105010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Neither textbooks nor more comprehensive works on diseases of children have much to say about hypertension. Hecht,1 in Pfaundler and Schlossman's Handbook on Diseases of Children, remarked: "Lasting increase of blood pressure is found particularly in cases of chronic nephritis, but also in scarlet fever nephritis after a few days. A further increase of blood pressure is often a precursor of uremia." A number of children with increased blood pressure, ranging in age from 6 to 16 years, was examined and treated at the Mayo Clinic during a period of about eight years. The progress of the disease after dismissal could not always be ascertained, with the exception of a few recent reports, and necropsies were not obtained. Nevertheless, the twenty-five cases serving as a basis for this report offer features of significance. According to Judson and Nicholson,2 and Faber and James,3 the systolic blood pressure does

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1929

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