Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

HYDRANENCEPHALY

HYDRANENCEPHALY HYDRANENCEPHALY is a congenital anomaly of the head that consists of complete or nearly complete absence of the cerebral hemispheres together with intact meninges and skull. It is associated with a normal-sized head when the condition is encountered early in infancy. Babies who have this anomaly present normal appearances and reactions during the first few weeks of life. Retardation of neuromuscular development and excessive enlargement of the head usually are not obvious until the child is several months old. This anomaly was first described by Cruveilhier in 1835 and was named "l'anencephalie hydrocephalique" (hydrocephalic anencephaly).1 This term later was consolidated into one word by Spielmeyer2 in 1905, and hydranencephaly has been the accepted designation for this condition, although Yakovlev and Wadsworth3 suggested the name "schizencephalies" after detailed histologic study of two cases. The latter authors considered the defect to be a true cerebral agenesia, with congenital clefts http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/hydranencephaly-90iVEHVzfB
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1953 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1953.02050070050005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

HYDRANENCEPHALY is a congenital anomaly of the head that consists of complete or nearly complete absence of the cerebral hemispheres together with intact meninges and skull. It is associated with a normal-sized head when the condition is encountered early in infancy. Babies who have this anomaly present normal appearances and reactions during the first few weeks of life. Retardation of neuromuscular development and excessive enlargement of the head usually are not obvious until the child is several months old. This anomaly was first described by Cruveilhier in 1835 and was named "l'anencephalie hydrocephalique" (hydrocephalic anencephaly).1 This term later was consolidated into one word by Spielmeyer2 in 1905, and hydranencephaly has been the accepted designation for this condition, although Yakovlev and Wadsworth3 suggested the name "schizencephalies" after detailed histologic study of two cases. The latter authors considered the defect to be a true cerebral agenesia, with congenital clefts

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1953

There are no references for this article.