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Hydatid Torsion

Hydatid Torsion Abstract Vestigial structures of the embryologic sex duct system may form cysts that produce symptoms requiring surgical intervention. Torsion of these remnants may occur in children or adults of both sexes. Two recent cases of hydatid torsion prompted review of the sites of these remnants and their embryologic origins. Report of Cases.—Case 1.—An 11-year-old girl was admitted to the hospital because of right lower quadrant pain and anorexia. For two weeks she had recurrent attacks of pain, starting in the epigastrium, and localizing in the right lower quadrant, without fever, vomiting, change in bowel habits, or dysuria. On examination there was exquisite tenderness in the right lower quadrant with voluntary guarding and no rebound tenderness. On rectal examination there was a tender, walnut-sized mass in the right adnexa. White blood cell count and urinalysis were unremarkable. Surgery was performed with a diagnosis of torsion of an ovarian cyst. References 1. Rolnick D, Kawanove S, Szanto P, et al: Incidence of testicular appendages . J Urol 100:755-756, 1968. 2. Patten BM: Human Embryology . New York, McGraw-Hill Book Co Inc, 1968. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1978 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1978.02120370068018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Vestigial structures of the embryologic sex duct system may form cysts that produce symptoms requiring surgical intervention. Torsion of these remnants may occur in children or adults of both sexes. Two recent cases of hydatid torsion prompted review of the sites of these remnants and their embryologic origins. Report of Cases.—Case 1.—An 11-year-old girl was admitted to the hospital because of right lower quadrant pain and anorexia. For two weeks she had recurrent attacks of pain, starting in the epigastrium, and localizing in the right lower quadrant, without fever, vomiting, change in bowel habits, or dysuria. On examination there was exquisite tenderness in the right lower quadrant with voluntary guarding and no rebound tenderness. On rectal examination there was a tender, walnut-sized mass in the right adnexa. White blood cell count and urinalysis were unremarkable. Surgery was performed with a diagnosis of torsion of an ovarian cyst. References 1. Rolnick D, Kawanove S, Szanto P, et al: Incidence of testicular appendages . J Urol 100:755-756, 1968. 2. Patten BM: Human Embryology . New York, McGraw-Hill Book Co Inc, 1968.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1978

References