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How to Use an Article Reporting a Multiple Treatment Comparison Meta-analysis

How to Use an Article Reporting a Multiple Treatment Comparison Meta-analysis USERS’ GUIDES TO THE MEDICAL LITERATURE How to Use an Article Reporting a Multiple Treatment Comparison Meta-analysis Edward J. Mills, PhD, MSc Multiple treatment comparison (MTC) meta-analysis uses both direct (head- John P. A. Ioannidis, MD, DSc to-head) randomized clinical trial (RCT) evidence as well as indirect evi- Kristian Thorlund, PhD, MSc dence from RCTs to compare the relative effectiveness of all included inter- Holger J. Schu¨ nemann, MD, PhD, MSc ventions. The methodological quality of MTCs may be difficult for clinicians Milo A. Puhan, MD, PhD to interpret because the number of interventions evaluated may be large and Gordon H. Guyatt, MD, MSc the methodological approaches may be complex. Clinicians and others evalu- ating an MTC should be aware of the potential biases that can affect the CLINICAL SCENARIO interpretation of these analyses. Readers should consider whether the pri- You are seeing a 45-year-old patient for mary studies are sufficiently homogeneous to combine; whether the differ- whom, 6 weeks previously, you pre- ent interventions are sufficiently similar in their populations, study designs, scribed paroxetine, a selective seroto- nin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), for treat- and outcomes; and whether the direct evidence is sufficiently similar to the ment of generalized http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

How to Use an Article Reporting a Multiple Treatment Comparison Meta-analysis

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/2012.jama.11228
pmid
23011714
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

USERS’ GUIDES TO THE MEDICAL LITERATURE How to Use an Article Reporting a Multiple Treatment Comparison Meta-analysis Edward J. Mills, PhD, MSc Multiple treatment comparison (MTC) meta-analysis uses both direct (head- John P. A. Ioannidis, MD, DSc to-head) randomized clinical trial (RCT) evidence as well as indirect evi- Kristian Thorlund, PhD, MSc dence from RCTs to compare the relative effectiveness of all included inter- Holger J. Schu¨ nemann, MD, PhD, MSc ventions. The methodological quality of MTCs may be difficult for clinicians Milo A. Puhan, MD, PhD to interpret because the number of interventions evaluated may be large and Gordon H. Guyatt, MD, MSc the methodological approaches may be complex. Clinicians and others evalu- ating an MTC should be aware of the potential biases that can affect the CLINICAL SCENARIO interpretation of these analyses. Readers should consider whether the pri- You are seeing a 45-year-old patient for mary studies are sufficiently homogeneous to combine; whether the differ- whom, 6 weeks previously, you pre- ent interventions are sufficiently similar in their populations, study designs, scribed paroxetine, a selective seroto- nin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), for treat- and outcomes; and whether the direct evidence is sufficiently similar to the ment of generalized

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 26, 2012

References