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How Squirrels Become Eunuchs.

How Squirrels Become Eunuchs. Craig Colony, Sonyea, N. Y., Feb. 22, 1898. To the Editor: —Relative to the discussion now going on in the Journal on the above subject, let me say that many years ago it was my pleasure to spend several weeks each fall for five successive years in squirrel-hunting in the eastern section of middle Alabama. My daily tramps in the sport were made with an elderly companion, a man of 60 years, who all his life had been an ardent lover of the sport, and who loved nothing better than the daily rambles through the great forests where the tallest trees grew and where gray and red squirrels (the latter also known as the fox squirrel) abounded. One day I shot a young male and on picking him up was surprised to find the entire scrotal sac missing, with evidence of a recent injury to the parts. I called my http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

How Squirrels Become Eunuchs.

JAMA , Volume XXX (10) – Mar 5, 1898

How Squirrels Become Eunuchs.

Abstract


Craig Colony, Sonyea, N. Y., Feb. 22, 1898.

To the Editor:
—Relative to the discussion now going on in the Journal on the above subject, let me say that many years ago it was my pleasure to spend several weeks each fall for five successive years in squirrel-hunting in the eastern section of middle Alabama. My daily tramps in the sport were made with an elderly companion, a man of 60 years, who all his life had been an ardent lover of the sport, and...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1898 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1898.02440620054017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Craig Colony, Sonyea, N. Y., Feb. 22, 1898. To the Editor: —Relative to the discussion now going on in the Journal on the above subject, let me say that many years ago it was my pleasure to spend several weeks each fall for five successive years in squirrel-hunting in the eastern section of middle Alabama. My daily tramps in the sport were made with an elderly companion, a man of 60 years, who all his life had been an ardent lover of the sport, and who loved nothing better than the daily rambles through the great forests where the tallest trees grew and where gray and red squirrels (the latter also known as the fox squirrel) abounded. One day I shot a young male and on picking him up was surprised to find the entire scrotal sac missing, with evidence of a recent injury to the parts. I called my

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 5, 1898

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