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Hospitalists and Residency Medical Education

Hospitalists and Residency Medical Education EDITORIAL Measured Improvement HE HOSPITALIST movement is driven by the changed. Also in contrast to the interns, the senior resi- belief that quality and efficiency of inpa- dents did not report a significant workload change, and tient care is improved when such care is the residents’ levels of stress were not significantly coordinated by a dedicated core group of changed. T physicians. Academic medical institu- It is concerning that senior residents perceived a tions are increasingly using hospitalists for their general nearly statistically significant decrease in independent de- inpatient services. However, little is known about the cision-making ability and supervisory skills following the impact of hospitalist programs on undergraduate or gradu- institution of the hospitalist program. The hospitalists’ ate medical education. greater supervisory involvement may adversely affect the The impact of hospitalist programs on inpatient development of leadership skills in senior residents and medical education must be rigorously evaluated to en- ultimately impair the development of independent de- sure that future pediatricians continue to receive the cision making. knowledge and master the skills necessary to provide high- The tradeoff between hospitalist availability and quality care. Inpatient care allows housestaff to gain ex- resident autonomy might be acceptable if there http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

Hospitalists and Residency Medical Education

JAMA Pediatrics , Volume 156 (9) – Sep 1, 2002

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2002 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.156.9.858
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EDITORIAL Measured Improvement HE HOSPITALIST movement is driven by the changed. Also in contrast to the interns, the senior resi- belief that quality and efficiency of inpa- dents did not report a significant workload change, and tient care is improved when such care is the residents’ levels of stress were not significantly coordinated by a dedicated core group of changed. T physicians. Academic medical institu- It is concerning that senior residents perceived a tions are increasingly using hospitalists for their general nearly statistically significant decrease in independent de- inpatient services. However, little is known about the cision-making ability and supervisory skills following the impact of hospitalist programs on undergraduate or gradu- institution of the hospitalist program. The hospitalists’ ate medical education. greater supervisory involvement may adversely affect the The impact of hospitalist programs on inpatient development of leadership skills in senior residents and medical education must be rigorously evaluated to en- ultimately impair the development of independent de- sure that future pediatricians continue to receive the cision making. knowledge and master the skills necessary to provide high- The tradeoff between hospitalist availability and quality care. Inpatient care allows housestaff to gain ex- resident autonomy might be acceptable if there

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 2002

References