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Hook Cannula for the Application of Chymotrypsin: A New Instrument

Hook Cannula for the Application of Chymotrypsin: A New Instrument Abstract One of the important steps in the procedure of cataract extraction with zonulolysis is the application of enzyme to the zonular fibers. Each surgeon uses a different instrument and a different technique for the application of chymotrypsin. This seems to suggest that the ideal instrument and technique has not yet been devised. It is possible, I believe, to compile several stipulations to which a good cannula for the application of enzyme should correspond. The cannula should not be a straight tube; by accident it may act as a javelin by piercing the delicate tissues inside the eye, because even small jerky movements at the plunger end may cause unfavorable results at the tip end of the cannula. A straight cannula which is partially flexed or bent, has identical disadvantages. The enzyme stream should be kept from flowing from the cannula with too much force. In a straight cannula the downward http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Hook Cannula for the Application of Chymotrypsin: A New Instrument

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 66 (3) – Sep 1, 1961

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1961 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1961.00960010343008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract One of the important steps in the procedure of cataract extraction with zonulolysis is the application of enzyme to the zonular fibers. Each surgeon uses a different instrument and a different technique for the application of chymotrypsin. This seems to suggest that the ideal instrument and technique has not yet been devised. It is possible, I believe, to compile several stipulations to which a good cannula for the application of enzyme should correspond. The cannula should not be a straight tube; by accident it may act as a javelin by piercing the delicate tissues inside the eye, because even small jerky movements at the plunger end may cause unfavorable results at the tip end of the cannula. A straight cannula which is partially flexed or bent, has identical disadvantages. The enzyme stream should be kept from flowing from the cannula with too much force. In a straight cannula the downward

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1961

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