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Histocompatibility (HL-A) Antigens and Psoriasis-Reply

Histocompatibility (HL-A) Antigens and Psoriasis-Reply This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract The association between disease and a genetic marker may be expressed either in terms of the antigen frequency in the patient, as compared to that in control groups, or as the relative risk. Svejgaard et al have defined the latter form of expression as an indication of "how many times more frequent the disease is in persons carrying the antigen as compared to individuals lacking the antigen" (Tissue Antigens 4:95, 1974). According to Svejgaard et al, relative risk calculations from previously published data show, for example, that psoriasis is approximately five times more frequent in persons possessing the HLA-B17 antigen than in persons lacking that antigen. Despite the increased relative risk, it is also clear that there is not a one-to-one association and that most people, either with or without HLA-B17 antigen, do not have psoriasis. We therefore believe that, although it is valid to state that a B17- (or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Histocompatibility (HL-A) Antigens and Psoriasis-Reply

Histocompatibility (HL-A) Antigens and Psoriasis-Reply

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract The association between disease and a genetic marker may be expressed either in terms of the antigen frequency in the patient, as compared to that in control groups, or as the relative risk. Svejgaard et al have defined the latter form of expression as an indication of "how many times more frequent the disease is in persons carrying the antigen as...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1976 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1976.01630310076021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract The association between disease and a genetic marker may be expressed either in terms of the antigen frequency in the patient, as compared to that in control groups, or as the relative risk. Svejgaard et al have defined the latter form of expression as an indication of "how many times more frequent the disease is in persons carrying the antigen as compared to individuals lacking the antigen" (Tissue Antigens 4:95, 1974). According to Svejgaard et al, relative risk calculations from previously published data show, for example, that psoriasis is approximately five times more frequent in persons possessing the HLA-B17 antigen than in persons lacking that antigen. Despite the increased relative risk, it is also clear that there is not a one-to-one association and that most people, either with or without HLA-B17 antigen, do not have psoriasis. We therefore believe that, although it is valid to state that a B17- (or

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1976

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