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Hispanics in Angloland

Hispanics in Angloland Abstract The termHispanic lacks precision. It can denote racial origin, a mother tongue, or a culture, depending on the context. The US Census Bureau defines it as a person of Spanishspeaking origin living in the United States. This has not prevented the application of the term in the medical literature to Spanish speakers in Ecuador!1 Sacco and Culebras agree on the shortcomings of the term Hispanic, but they disagree on what to do about it. Sacco would retain it for the sake of finding out more about the burden of disease of a large segment of the American people, and the comparability of data on this poorly defined population. Culebras would discard the term. Demographers, epidemiologists, and taxonomists should get together to work out more precise terms to describe populations diverse in race, culture, and country of origin. In the meantime, if the term Hispanic is to be used References 1. Del Brutto OH, Mosquera A, Sanchez X, Santos J, Noboa CA. Stroke subtypes among Hispanics living in Guayaquil, Ecuador: results from the Luis Vernaza Hospital stroke registry . Stroke . 1993; 24:1833-1836.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

Hispanics in Angloland

Archives of Neurology , Volume 52 (5) – May 1, 1995

Hispanics in Angloland

Abstract

Abstract The termHispanic lacks precision. It can denote racial origin, a mother tongue, or a culture, depending on the context. The US Census Bureau defines it as a person of Spanishspeaking origin living in the United States. This has not prevented the application of the term in the medical literature to Spanish speakers in Ecuador!1 Sacco and Culebras agree on the shortcomings of the term Hispanic, but they disagree on what to do about it. Sacco would retain it for the sake of finding out...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.1995.00540290124030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The termHispanic lacks precision. It can denote racial origin, a mother tongue, or a culture, depending on the context. The US Census Bureau defines it as a person of Spanishspeaking origin living in the United States. This has not prevented the application of the term in the medical literature to Spanish speakers in Ecuador!1 Sacco and Culebras agree on the shortcomings of the term Hispanic, but they disagree on what to do about it. Sacco would retain it for the sake of finding out more about the burden of disease of a large segment of the American people, and the comparability of data on this poorly defined population. Culebras would discard the term. Demographers, epidemiologists, and taxonomists should get together to work out more precise terms to describe populations diverse in race, culture, and country of origin. In the meantime, if the term Hispanic is to be used References 1. Del Brutto OH, Mosquera A, Sanchez X, Santos J, Noboa CA. Stroke subtypes among Hispanics living in Guayaquil, Ecuador: results from the Luis Vernaza Hospital stroke registry . Stroke . 1993; 24:1833-1836.Crossref

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1995

References

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