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Hispanic: An Epidemiologically Meaningless Term

Hispanic: An Epidemiologically Meaningless Term Abstract In recent years, the medical literature has seen a spate of works using Hispanic individuals as the study cohort. A review of the literature for the years 1991 through 1993 has uncovered 525 studies related to sociomedical issues in Hispanic subjects, of which 81 alone deal with the subject of stroke or related risk factors. Some studies are broad based1 and refer to Hispanics in general; other studies are more restricted and limit their scope to a circumscribed county population of Hispanic individuals.2 There are articles comparing black, Caucasian, and Hispanic families3 or distinguishing between Hispanic and non-Hispanic whites,4 or studying the differences between English- and Spanish-speaking populations.5 In yet another study, surname data are used for the analysis of the mortality of US Puerto Ricans.6 The concept of Hispanic appears to be in constant flux from study to study. Readers have an intuitive References 1. Georges E, Mueller WH, Wear ML. Body fat distribution in men and women of the Hispanic health and nutrition examination survey of the United States: associations with behavioral variables . Ann Hum Biol . 1993;20:275-291.Crossref 2. Hanis CL, Hewett-Emmett D, Douglas TC, Schull WJ. Lipoprotein and apolipoprotein levels among Mexican-Americans in Starr County, Texas . Arterioscler Thromb . 1991;11:123-129.Crossref 3. Langlois JH, Ritter JM, Casey RJ. Maternal and infant demographics and health status: a comparison of black, Caucasian, and Hispanic families . J Biosoc Sci . 1991;23:91-105.Crossref 4. Foucar K, Duncan MH, Stidley CA, Wiggins CL, Hunt WC, Key CR. Survival of children and adolescents with acute lymphoid leukemia: a study of American Indians and Hispanic and non-Hispanic whites treated in New Mexico (1969-1986) . Cancer . 1991;67:2125-2130.Crossref 5. Di Pede C, Viegi G, Quackenboss JJ, Boyer Pfersdorf P, Lebowitz MD. Respiratory symptoms and risk factors in an Arizona population sample of Anglo- and Mexican-American whites . Chest . 1991;99:916-922.Crossref 6. Rosenwaike I, Hempstead K, Rogers RG. Using surname data in US: Puerto Rican mortality analysis . Demography . 1991;28:175-180.Crossref 7. US Office of Personnel Management. Standard form 181 (revised May 1982). Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office; 1988. FPM Supplement 298-1. 8. Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary . Springfield, Mass: Merriam-Webster Inc Publishers; 1984. 9. Real Academia Española. Diccionario de la Lengua Española . Madrid, Spain: Editorial Espasa-Calpe, SA; 1992. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

Hispanic: An Epidemiologically Meaningless Term

Archives of Neurology , Volume 52 (5) – May 1, 1995

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.1995.00540290123029
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In recent years, the medical literature has seen a spate of works using Hispanic individuals as the study cohort. A review of the literature for the years 1991 through 1993 has uncovered 525 studies related to sociomedical issues in Hispanic subjects, of which 81 alone deal with the subject of stroke or related risk factors. Some studies are broad based1 and refer to Hispanics in general; other studies are more restricted and limit their scope to a circumscribed county population of Hispanic individuals.2 There are articles comparing black, Caucasian, and Hispanic families3 or distinguishing between Hispanic and non-Hispanic whites,4 or studying the differences between English- and Spanish-speaking populations.5 In yet another study, surname data are used for the analysis of the mortality of US Puerto Ricans.6 The concept of Hispanic appears to be in constant flux from study to study. Readers have an intuitive References 1. Georges E, Mueller WH, Wear ML. Body fat distribution in men and women of the Hispanic health and nutrition examination survey of the United States: associations with behavioral variables . Ann Hum Biol . 1993;20:275-291.Crossref 2. Hanis CL, Hewett-Emmett D, Douglas TC, Schull WJ. Lipoprotein and apolipoprotein levels among Mexican-Americans in Starr County, Texas . Arterioscler Thromb . 1991;11:123-129.Crossref 3. Langlois JH, Ritter JM, Casey RJ. Maternal and infant demographics and health status: a comparison of black, Caucasian, and Hispanic families . J Biosoc Sci . 1991;23:91-105.Crossref 4. Foucar K, Duncan MH, Stidley CA, Wiggins CL, Hunt WC, Key CR. Survival of children and adolescents with acute lymphoid leukemia: a study of American Indians and Hispanic and non-Hispanic whites treated in New Mexico (1969-1986) . Cancer . 1991;67:2125-2130.Crossref 5. Di Pede C, Viegi G, Quackenboss JJ, Boyer Pfersdorf P, Lebowitz MD. Respiratory symptoms and risk factors in an Arizona population sample of Anglo- and Mexican-American whites . Chest . 1991;99:916-922.Crossref 6. Rosenwaike I, Hempstead K, Rogers RG. Using surname data in US: Puerto Rican mortality analysis . Demography . 1991;28:175-180.Crossref 7. US Office of Personnel Management. Standard form 181 (revised May 1982). Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office; 1988. FPM Supplement 298-1. 8. Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary . Springfield, Mass: Merriam-Webster Inc Publishers; 1984. 9. Real Academia Española. Diccionario de la Lengua Española . Madrid, Spain: Editorial Espasa-Calpe, SA; 1992.

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1995

References