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Highlights

Highlights In This Issue June 2015 JAMA Otolaryngology– Volume 141, Number 6 Pages 493-588 Head & Neck Surgery Research Clinical Review & Education Clinical Challenge Quality-of-Life Outcomes for TORS for Oropharyngeal Cancer 499 PATHOLOGY The application of robotic surgery for the treatment of oropharyngeal squamous cell car- cinoma has provided another therapy option. Choby and associates studied quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes from 34 patients with oropharyngeal squamous cancer who were treat- ed only with transoral robotic surgery between May 2010 and March 2014. Patients com- pleted the University of Washington QOL questionnaire 1, 6, 12, and 24 months after sur- gery. As expected, most patients had T1 and T2 disease with N0 or N1 necks. Two patients died during follow-up. Statistically signifi cant improvements were noted in chewing, swal- lowing, pain, and activity, showing acceptable short- to moderate-term QOL parameters. 573 What is your diagnosis? Insurance Status and Quality of Care in Acute Rhinosinusitis 505 Bergmark and associates sought to determine whether insurance status aff ected the qual- RADIOLOGY ity of care received by patients with acute rhinosinusitis. They performed a cross-sectional study of 13 680 145 patients with acute rhinosinusitis from the 2009 and 2010 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery American Medical Association

Highlights

Abstract

In This Issue June 2015 JAMA Otolaryngology– Volume 141, Number 6 Pages 493-588 Head & Neck Surgery Research Clinical Review & Education Clinical Challenge Quality-of-Life Outcomes for TORS for Oropharyngeal Cancer 499 PATHOLOGY The application of robotic surgery for the treatment of oropharyngeal squamous cell car- cinoma has provided another therapy option. Choby and associates studied quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes from 34 patients with oropharyngeal squamous cancer who were...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2015 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6181
eISSN
2168-619X
DOI
10.1001/jamaoto.2014.2157
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In This Issue June 2015 JAMA Otolaryngology– Volume 141, Number 6 Pages 493-588 Head & Neck Surgery Research Clinical Review & Education Clinical Challenge Quality-of-Life Outcomes for TORS for Oropharyngeal Cancer 499 PATHOLOGY The application of robotic surgery for the treatment of oropharyngeal squamous cell car- cinoma has provided another therapy option. Choby and associates studied quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes from 34 patients with oropharyngeal squamous cancer who were treat- ed only with transoral robotic surgery between May 2010 and March 2014. Patients com- pleted the University of Washington QOL questionnaire 1, 6, 12, and 24 months after sur- gery. As expected, most patients had T1 and T2 disease with N0 or N1 necks. Two patients died during follow-up. Statistically signifi cant improvements were noted in chewing, swal- lowing, pain, and activity, showing acceptable short- to moderate-term QOL parameters. 573 What is your diagnosis? Insurance Status and Quality of Care in Acute Rhinosinusitis 505 Bergmark and associates sought to determine whether insurance status aff ected the qual- RADIOLOGY ity of care received by patients with acute rhinosinusitis. They performed a cross-sectional study of 13 680 145 patients with acute rhinosinusitis from the 2009 and 2010 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.

Journal

JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 2015

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