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Highlights

Highlights Research Suicide Rates in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer The fear of cancer extends to all levels of severity and economic sites, and it has been surmised that the suicide rate in patients with head and neck cancer is greater than that in the general population. Kam and colleagues evaluated 350 413 cases of head and neck cancer reported in the SEER Registry between 1973 and 2011 and found a suicide rate more than 3 times that in the general population. Suicide rates were higher in those treated with radiotherapy alone vs only surgery, and the highest risk was in those with cancer of the hypopharynx and larynx. Thyroid Nodule Size, Bethesda Class, and Malignancy Rate To determine whether a larger thyroid nodule might produce a greater degree of sampling error during pathologic analysis of the fine-needle aspirate, Magister and colleagues reviewed 297 patients undergoing fine-needle aspiration followed by thyroidectomy between March 2010 and December 2013. A total of 326 thyroid nodules were evaluated. They found that thyroid nodules smaller than 3 cm had a higher malignancy rate than those 3 cm or greater. Higher Bethesda class and nodule size less than 2 cm were associated with an increased probability of malignancy. In addition, the authors suggest that routine thyroid lobectomy for larger nodules 3 cm or greater not be performed. Nonsurgical Therapy Better in Advanced Supraglottic Cancer? While the initial study from Michigan revealed comparative laryngeal salvage with chemoradiation therapy vs total laryngectomy for this disease group, Elegbede and colleagues looked a step beyond and evaluated not only absolute survival but voice, swallowing, and recurrence rate. In this review of patients treated between January 1990 and June 2013, 97 patients with stage III/IV SCCA of the supraglottic larynx were treated surgically and 138 patients received nonsurgical therapy. Surgical therapy was associated with a better freedom from recurrence, but overall survival was essentially the same, as was swallowing function; logically, laryngeal preservation and voice quality were superior in the chemoradiation therapy group. Aggressive Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Treatment and Survival Anaplastic thyroid cancer has been a diagnosis with little opportunity for survival—despite prior attempts to provide aggressive combination therapy—and short survival after diagnosis. Nachalon and colleagues evaluated the impact of aggressive surgery when feasible and full-dose chemoradiotherapy in 26 patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer treated between 2008 and 2013. As expected, while no panacea was found, the authors found that aggressive surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy seemed to improve survival, but note that in general, the ultimate outcome from this malignant neoplasm remains grave. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery American Medical Association

Highlights

Abstract

Research Suicide Rates in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer The fear of cancer extends to all levels of severity and economic sites, and it has been surmised that the suicide rate in patients with head and neck cancer is greater than that in the general population. Kam and colleagues evaluated 350 413 cases of head and neck cancer reported in the SEER Registry between 1973 and 2011 and found a suicide rate more than 3 times that in the general population. Suicide rates were higher in...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6181
eISSN
2168-619X
DOI
10.1001/jamaoto.2014.2187
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Research Suicide Rates in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer The fear of cancer extends to all levels of severity and economic sites, and it has been surmised that the suicide rate in patients with head and neck cancer is greater than that in the general population. Kam and colleagues evaluated 350 413 cases of head and neck cancer reported in the SEER Registry between 1973 and 2011 and found a suicide rate more than 3 times that in the general population. Suicide rates were higher in those treated with radiotherapy alone vs only surgery, and the highest risk was in those with cancer of the hypopharynx and larynx. Thyroid Nodule Size, Bethesda Class, and Malignancy Rate To determine whether a larger thyroid nodule might produce a greater degree of sampling error during pathologic analysis of the fine-needle aspirate, Magister and colleagues reviewed 297 patients undergoing fine-needle aspiration followed by thyroidectomy between March 2010 and December 2013. A total of 326 thyroid nodules were evaluated. They found that thyroid nodules smaller than 3 cm had a higher malignancy rate than those 3 cm or greater. Higher Bethesda class and nodule size less than 2 cm were associated with an increased probability of malignancy. In addition, the authors suggest that routine thyroid lobectomy for larger nodules 3 cm or greater not be performed. Nonsurgical Therapy Better in Advanced Supraglottic Cancer? While the initial study from Michigan revealed comparative laryngeal salvage with chemoradiation therapy vs total laryngectomy for this disease group, Elegbede and colleagues looked a step beyond and evaluated not only absolute survival but voice, swallowing, and recurrence rate. In this review of patients treated between January 1990 and June 2013, 97 patients with stage III/IV SCCA of the supraglottic larynx were treated surgically and 138 patients received nonsurgical therapy. Surgical therapy was associated with a better freedom from recurrence, but overall survival was essentially the same, as was swallowing function; logically, laryngeal preservation and voice quality were superior in the chemoradiation therapy group. Aggressive Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Treatment and Survival Anaplastic thyroid cancer has been a diagnosis with little opportunity for survival—despite prior attempts to provide aggressive combination therapy—and short survival after diagnosis. Nachalon and colleagues evaluated the impact of aggressive surgery when feasible and full-dose chemoradiotherapy in 26 patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer treated between 2008 and 2013. As expected, while no panacea was found, the authors found that aggressive surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy seemed to improve survival, but note that in general, the ultimate outcome from this malignant neoplasm remains grave.

Journal

JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 2015

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