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Highlights

Highlights November 2016 In This Issue Volume 134, Number 11 Pages 1209-1340 JAMA Ophthalmology Research Clinical Review & Education JAMA Ophthalmology Follow-up Eye Care After Diabetic Retinopathy Screening 1221 Clinical Challenge Because the public health success of diabetic retinopathy screening programs depends, in part, on patients’ adherence to the timetable of follow-up eye care recommended by the screening program, Keenum and coauthors evaluate to what extent patients with diabe- tes in a diabetic retinopathy screening program adhere to the timetable of recommended follow-up eye examinations. In a follow-up study, only about 30% of patients adhered to recommendations to have an eye examination within the indicated time frames, even when cost and accessibility were minimized as barriers. Two years later, about half of the patients still had not undergone an eye examination. These data suggest that diabetic reti- nopathy screening programs may need additional strategies that can address limitations 1321 What would you do next? of patients to adhere to eye care follow-up recommendations. Invited Commentary 1228 LETTERS Research Letter Prevalence of Noninfectious Uveitis in the United States 1237 1130 Presence of Zika Virus Because there are few studies investigating the prevalence of noninfectious uveitis over- in Conjunctival Fluid J Sun http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Highlights

JAMA Ophthalmology , Volume 134 (11) – Nov 1, 2016

Highlights

Abstract

November 2016 In This Issue Volume 134, Number 11 Pages 1209-1340 JAMA Ophthalmology Research Clinical Review & Education JAMA Ophthalmology Follow-up Eye Care After Diabetic Retinopathy Screening 1221 Clinical Challenge Because the public health success of diabetic retinopathy screening programs depends, in part, on patients’ adherence to the timetable of follow-up eye care recommended by the screening program, Keenum and coauthors evaluate to what extent patients with diabe- tes...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6165
eISSN
2168-6173
DOI
10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2015.3268
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

November 2016 In This Issue Volume 134, Number 11 Pages 1209-1340 JAMA Ophthalmology Research Clinical Review & Education JAMA Ophthalmology Follow-up Eye Care After Diabetic Retinopathy Screening 1221 Clinical Challenge Because the public health success of diabetic retinopathy screening programs depends, in part, on patients’ adherence to the timetable of follow-up eye care recommended by the screening program, Keenum and coauthors evaluate to what extent patients with diabe- tes in a diabetic retinopathy screening program adhere to the timetable of recommended follow-up eye examinations. In a follow-up study, only about 30% of patients adhered to recommendations to have an eye examination within the indicated time frames, even when cost and accessibility were minimized as barriers. Two years later, about half of the patients still had not undergone an eye examination. These data suggest that diabetic reti- nopathy screening programs may need additional strategies that can address limitations 1321 What would you do next? of patients to adhere to eye care follow-up recommendations. Invited Commentary 1228 LETTERS Research Letter Prevalence of Noninfectious Uveitis in the United States 1237 1130 Presence of Zika Virus Because there are few studies investigating the prevalence of noninfectious uveitis over- in Conjunctival Fluid J Sun

Journal

JAMA OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 2016

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