Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Higher Cortical Functions in Man.

Higher Cortical Functions in Man. This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract This is an important book, if only because it summarizes the views and experience of Professor Luria, the dean of Soviet neuropsychologists. For this reason any disappointment that one may express with regard to its contents needs to be backed by argument. The book falls into three sections: a review of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology as they relate to organic disorders of mental function; a correlation of such disorders with lesions of different cortical regions; and lastly, a description of the methods of clinical examination employed, eg, aphasia, apraxia, and memory disturbances. In the first section the burden of discussion concerns the localizationist's and antilocalizationist's theories of mental function. Professor Luria's solution to this controversy is given by reference to the Pavlovian system of cortical analyzers, which he describes as "dynamically localized." Some of the important clinical material relevant to problems of localization is sketchily presented, eg, the questions posed by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

Higher Cortical Functions in Man.

Archives of Neurology , Volume 14 (6) – Jun 1, 1966

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/higher-cortical-functions-in-man-sFGpbh1QhP
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.1966.00470120113016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract This is an important book, if only because it summarizes the views and experience of Professor Luria, the dean of Soviet neuropsychologists. For this reason any disappointment that one may express with regard to its contents needs to be backed by argument. The book falls into three sections: a review of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology as they relate to organic disorders of mental function; a correlation of such disorders with lesions of different cortical regions; and lastly, a description of the methods of clinical examination employed, eg, aphasia, apraxia, and memory disturbances. In the first section the burden of discussion concerns the localizationist's and antilocalizationist's theories of mental function. Professor Luria's solution to this controversy is given by reference to the Pavlovian system of cortical analyzers, which he describes as "dynamically localized." Some of the important clinical material relevant to problems of localization is sketchily presented, eg, the questions posed by

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1966

There are no references for this article.