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High-Frequency Ultrasound Digital Signal Processing for Biometry of the Cornea in Planning Phototherapeutic Keratectomy

High-Frequency Ultrasound Digital Signal Processing for Biometry of the Cornea in Planning... Abstract To the Editor. —Measurement of epithelial thickness and accurate location of corneal pathologic conditions have relied on slit-lamp examination and optical pachymetry.1 Recent advances in ultrasound transducer technology have enabled ultrasound pulses of shorter duration and higher frequency (10 to 100 MHz) to be produced. High-frequency ultrasound has been used to study the angle of the anterior chamber, but the resolution is sufficient to suggest a role for ultrasound in analysis of corneal diseases.2We used a high-frequency ultrasound scanning system that acquires serial parallel scans through a water-bath coupling medium.3 The ultrasound data were digitized and computationally enhanced to provide optimal estimates of interface locations using digital signal-processing techniques (the deconvolved analytic signal magnitude [DAS] of the echo data).3 This provided improved precision vis-à-vis conventional analog peak detection (A-scan).4A normal human corneal scan (Fig 1, top) shows the epithelial-stromal acoustic interface superficially at References 1. Stark WJ, Gilbert ML, Gottsch JD, Munnerlyn C. Optical pachometry in the measurement of anterior corneal disease: an evaluative tool for phototherapeutic keratectomy . Arch Ophthalmol . 1990;108:12-13.Crossref 2. Pavlin CJ, Michael DS, Foster FS. Subsurface ultrasound microscopic imaging of the intact eye . Ophthalmology . 1990;97:224-250.Crossref 3. Coleman DJ, Silverman RH, Woods SM, Rondeau MJ. Advances in ophthalmic ultrasound. In: Haik B, Mafee M, eds. Advanced Ophthalmic Imaging. Boston, Mass: Little Brown & Co Inc. In press. 4. Gammell PM. Improved ultrasonic detection using analytic signal magnitude . Ultrasonics . 1981;19:73-76.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

High-Frequency Ultrasound Digital Signal Processing for Biometry of the Cornea in Planning Phototherapeutic Keratectomy

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1993.01090040020013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor. —Measurement of epithelial thickness and accurate location of corneal pathologic conditions have relied on slit-lamp examination and optical pachymetry.1 Recent advances in ultrasound transducer technology have enabled ultrasound pulses of shorter duration and higher frequency (10 to 100 MHz) to be produced. High-frequency ultrasound has been used to study the angle of the anterior chamber, but the resolution is sufficient to suggest a role for ultrasound in analysis of corneal diseases.2We used a high-frequency ultrasound scanning system that acquires serial parallel scans through a water-bath coupling medium.3 The ultrasound data were digitized and computationally enhanced to provide optimal estimates of interface locations using digital signal-processing techniques (the deconvolved analytic signal magnitude [DAS] of the echo data).3 This provided improved precision vis-à-vis conventional analog peak detection (A-scan).4A normal human corneal scan (Fig 1, top) shows the epithelial-stromal acoustic interface superficially at References 1. Stark WJ, Gilbert ML, Gottsch JD, Munnerlyn C. Optical pachometry in the measurement of anterior corneal disease: an evaluative tool for phototherapeutic keratectomy . Arch Ophthalmol . 1990;108:12-13.Crossref 2. Pavlin CJ, Michael DS, Foster FS. Subsurface ultrasound microscopic imaging of the intact eye . Ophthalmology . 1990;97:224-250.Crossref 3. Coleman DJ, Silverman RH, Woods SM, Rondeau MJ. Advances in ophthalmic ultrasound. In: Haik B, Mafee M, eds. Advanced Ophthalmic Imaging. Boston, Mass: Little Brown & Co Inc. In press. 4. Gammell PM. Improved ultrasonic detection using analytic signal magnitude . Ultrasonics . 1981;19:73-76.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1993

References

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