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Herpes Zoster Trigeminal Neuralgia: Pain Relief by Alcoholic Block of the Great Occipital Nerve

Herpes Zoster Trigeminal Neuralgia: Pain Relief by Alcoholic Block of the Great Occipital Nerve Abstract We would like to report a simple technique used in treating six cases of herpes zoster trigeminal neuralgia seen at our office within the past 18 months. This procedure is based on the technique suggested by Dr. P. G. Skillern Sr.1 An anatomical diagram to illustrate the probable rationale for such therapy is presented in Figure 1. The technique for injection of the great occipital nerve on the affected side is as follows: The patient is placed sitting in a chair with the posterior scalp facing an adequate light source. Figure 2 shows a small curette searching for pinpoint tenderness. Pressure on this point produces pain which betrays the site of the great occipital nerve. The main trunk of this nerve traverses a vertical course ranging from one-fourth to one inch lateral to a midpoint on the occipital protuberance. This site can then be marked with a suitable staining References 1. Skillern, P. G.: Great Occipital-Trigeminus Syndrome as Revealed by Induction of Block , A.M.A. Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 72:335-340 ( (Sept.) ) 1954. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Herpes Zoster Trigeminal Neuralgia: Pain Relief by Alcoholic Block of the Great Occipital Nerve

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 82 (2) – Aug 1, 1960

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1960 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1960.01580020089015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract We would like to report a simple technique used in treating six cases of herpes zoster trigeminal neuralgia seen at our office within the past 18 months. This procedure is based on the technique suggested by Dr. P. G. Skillern Sr.1 An anatomical diagram to illustrate the probable rationale for such therapy is presented in Figure 1. The technique for injection of the great occipital nerve on the affected side is as follows: The patient is placed sitting in a chair with the posterior scalp facing an adequate light source. Figure 2 shows a small curette searching for pinpoint tenderness. Pressure on this point produces pain which betrays the site of the great occipital nerve. The main trunk of this nerve traverses a vertical course ranging from one-fourth to one inch lateral to a midpoint on the occipital protuberance. This site can then be marked with a suitable staining References 1. Skillern, P. G.: Great Occipital-Trigeminus Syndrome as Revealed by Induction of Block , A.M.A. Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 72:335-340 ( (Sept.) ) 1954.

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1960

References