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HERPES PROGENITALIS AS A VENEREAL CONTAGION

HERPES PROGENITALIS AS A VENEREAL CONTAGION Abstract The infectious (virus) nature of many herpetiform eruptions has been established by the production in animals and in human beings of comparable reactions in skin or mucous membrane from inoculation with material from spontaneously evoked lesions. Concerning herpes febralis and herpes progenitalis, similar studies have led to the conclusion that their respective viruses are immunologically distinct, a distinction corroborated by the epidemiologic features of both.1 Long before a virus became suspected, nineteenth century clinicians of wide experience were sufficiently impressed with the persistent history of venereal disease in patients presenting genital herpes to surmise a venereal origin for the latter. Yet no single, unequivocal case history is recorded that establishes this clinical picture as a venereal contagion in its own right. For this reason the following short reports of 2 cases are recorded. The absolute reliability of the pertinent facts cogently argues acceptance of the theory of a venereal References 1. Jadassohn, J.: Handbuch der Haut- und Geschlechtskrankheiten , Berlin, Julius Springer, 1932, vol. 11, p. 140. 2. Greenough, F. B.: Arch. Dermat. 5:1 ( (Jan.) ) 1881. 3. Unna, P. G.: J. Cutan. & Ven. Dis. 1:321 ( (Aug.) ) 1883. 4. Naegeli, O.: München. med. Wchnschr. 83:339 ( (Feb. 28) ) 1936. 5. Dr. Charles Rein, of New York, who has had a large experience in the examination of female prisoners in the House of Detention stated the belief that he has encountered among them, several cases of genital herpes. He was good enough to let me include in this report the pertinent facts of 2 cases from his private records. A woman who was receiving treatment for frequently recurring genital herpes married during this period of treatment. Nine months after the marriage an initial attack of penile herpes occurred in the husband and was followed by recurrences. The rarity of genital herpes minimizes the force of coincidence as explanatory of these 2 cases in connubium. The fact that the husband had approximately nine months of exposure before taking the infection has well understood immunologic significance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology and Syphilology American Medical Association

HERPES PROGENITALIS AS A VENEREAL CONTAGION

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1940 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6029
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1940.01490170183017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The infectious (virus) nature of many herpetiform eruptions has been established by the production in animals and in human beings of comparable reactions in skin or mucous membrane from inoculation with material from spontaneously evoked lesions. Concerning herpes febralis and herpes progenitalis, similar studies have led to the conclusion that their respective viruses are immunologically distinct, a distinction corroborated by the epidemiologic features of both.1 Long before a virus became suspected, nineteenth century clinicians of wide experience were sufficiently impressed with the persistent history of venereal disease in patients presenting genital herpes to surmise a venereal origin for the latter. Yet no single, unequivocal case history is recorded that establishes this clinical picture as a venereal contagion in its own right. For this reason the following short reports of 2 cases are recorded. The absolute reliability of the pertinent facts cogently argues acceptance of the theory of a venereal References 1. Jadassohn, J.: Handbuch der Haut- und Geschlechtskrankheiten , Berlin, Julius Springer, 1932, vol. 11, p. 140. 2. Greenough, F. B.: Arch. Dermat. 5:1 ( (Jan.) ) 1881. 3. Unna, P. G.: J. Cutan. & Ven. Dis. 1:321 ( (Aug.) ) 1883. 4. Naegeli, O.: München. med. Wchnschr. 83:339 ( (Feb. 28) ) 1936. 5. Dr. Charles Rein, of New York, who has had a large experience in the examination of female prisoners in the House of Detention stated the belief that he has encountered among them, several cases of genital herpes. He was good enough to let me include in this report the pertinent facts of 2 cases from his private records. A woman who was receiving treatment for frequently recurring genital herpes married during this period of treatment. Nine months after the marriage an initial attack of penile herpes occurred in the husband and was followed by recurrences. The rarity of genital herpes minimizes the force of coincidence as explanatory of these 2 cases in connubium. The fact that the husband had approximately nine months of exposure before taking the infection has well understood immunologic significance.

Journal

Archives of Dermatology and SyphilologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1940

References