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HEMOLYTIC DISEASE OF THE NEWBORN DUE TO ABO INCOMPATIBILITY

HEMOLYTIC DISEASE OF THE NEWBORN DUE TO ABO INCOMPATIBILITY IT IS GENERALLY agreed that hemolytic disease of the newborn is usually caused by antibodies formed in Rhesus-negative mothers against the Rh factor D (Rh0) of Rhesus-positive children. According to Wallerstein1 this mechanism accounts for 92%, according to Mollison2 for some 95%, of all cases of the disease. Of the remaining instances, a few are due to sensitization of the mother against one of the other Rh antigens or against an antigen belonging to a different blood group system such as Kell. This still leaves a residue of unexplained cases, and in many of these incompatibility of the major ABO blood groups has been held responsible. By now a considerable number of instances of the disease attributed to maternal anti-A or anti-B antibodies has been recorded all over the world. In 1948, Grumbach and Gasser3 fully reviewed the literature of the subject and added nine cases http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

HEMOLYTIC DISEASE OF THE NEWBORN DUE TO ABO INCOMPATIBILITY

American journal of diseases of children , Volume 85 (6) – Jun 1, 1953

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1953 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1953.02050070672004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IT IS GENERALLY agreed that hemolytic disease of the newborn is usually caused by antibodies formed in Rhesus-negative mothers against the Rh factor D (Rh0) of Rhesus-positive children. According to Wallerstein1 this mechanism accounts for 92%, according to Mollison2 for some 95%, of all cases of the disease. Of the remaining instances, a few are due to sensitization of the mother against one of the other Rh antigens or against an antigen belonging to a different blood group system such as Kell. This still leaves a residue of unexplained cases, and in many of these incompatibility of the major ABO blood groups has been held responsible. By now a considerable number of instances of the disease attributed to maternal anti-A or anti-B antibodies has been recorded all over the world. In 1948, Grumbach and Gasser3 fully reviewed the literature of the subject and added nine cases

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1953

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