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Hemiplegic Migraine and Moyamoya Disease

Hemiplegic Migraine and Moyamoya Disease Abstract Sir.—Hemiplegic migraine is a form of complicated migraine.1 In children, such migraine without headache often manifests initially as transient hemiplegia,2,3 and the symptoms may be indistinguishable from those of transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). Moyamoya disease is a rare vasculopathy of the intracranial portion of the carotid and vertebral arteries4 and is of unknown origin. Moyamoya disease occurs in children and young adults and causes occlusion of the major cerebral vessels.5-8 Initial signs are usually strokes, seizures, or TIAs.9 After a major neurologic event, cerebral angiography is often used to diagnose moyamoya disease. Moyamoya ("puff of smoke" in Japanese) disease was previously identified from angiograms showing telangiectatic vessels acting as collateral channels to the occluded distal carotid arteries.10 More recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to identify the abnormal occluded vessels as well as the dilated collateral vessels in the basal ganglia References 1. Headache Classification Committee of the International Headache Society. Classification and diagnostic criteria for headache disorders, cranial neuralgias and facial pain . Cephalalgia . 1988;8( (suppl 7) ):1-96.Crossref 2. Glista GG, Mellinger JF, Rooke ED. Familial hemiplegic migraine . Mayo Clin Proc . 1975; 50:307-311. 3. Verret S, Steele JC. Alternating hemiplegia in childhood: a report of eight patients with complicated migraine beginning in infancy . Pediatrics . 1971;47:675-680. 4. Yonekawa Y, Handa H, Okuno T. Moyamoya disease: diagnosis, treatment, and recent achievement . In: Barnett HJM, Mohr HJM, Yatsu FM, eds. Stroke: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management . New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone Inc; 1986:805-829. 5. Ausman JI, Diaz FG, Ma SH, Dujovny M, Sadasivan B. Cerebrovascular occlusive disease in children: a survey . Acta Neurochir (Wien) . 1988;94:117-128.Crossref 6. Bruno A, Adams HP Jr, Biller J, Resai K, Cornell S, Aschenbrener CA. Cerebral infarction due to moyamoya disease in young adults . Stroke . 1988;19:826-833.Crossref 7. Matsushima T, Fukui M, Fujii K, et al. Two pediatric cases with occlusions of the ipsilateral carotid and posterior cerebral arteries associated with moyamoya vessels: 'unilateral' moyamoya disease . Surg Neurol . 1990;33:276-280.Crossref 8. Prensky AL, Davis DO. Obstruction of major cerebral vessels in early childhood without neurological signs . Neurology . 1970;20:945-953.Crossref 9. Carlson CB, Harvey FH, Loop J. Progressive alternating hemiplegia in early childhood with basal arterial stenosis and telangiectasia (moyamoya syndrome) . Neurology . 1973;23: 734-744.Crossref 10. Gordon N, Isler W. Childhood moyamoya disease . Dev Med Child Neurol . 1989;31:98-107. 11. Bruno A, Yuh WTC, Biller J, Adams HP Jr, Cornell SH. Magnetic resonance imaging in young adults with cerebral infarction due to moyamoya . Arch Neurol . 1988;45:303-306.Crossref 12. Matsushima Y, Aoyagi M, Niimi Y, Masaoka H, Ohno K. Symptoms and their pattern of progression in childhood moyamoya disease . Brain Dev . 1990;12:784-789.Crossref 13. Rooney CM, Kaye EM, Scott RM, Klucznik RP, Rosman NP. Modified encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis as a surgical treatment of childhood moyamoya disease: report of five cases . J Child Neurol . 1991;6:24-31.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Hemiplegic Migraine and Moyamoya Disease

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1993.02160310020008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Sir.—Hemiplegic migraine is a form of complicated migraine.1 In children, such migraine without headache often manifests initially as transient hemiplegia,2,3 and the symptoms may be indistinguishable from those of transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). Moyamoya disease is a rare vasculopathy of the intracranial portion of the carotid and vertebral arteries4 and is of unknown origin. Moyamoya disease occurs in children and young adults and causes occlusion of the major cerebral vessels.5-8 Initial signs are usually strokes, seizures, or TIAs.9 After a major neurologic event, cerebral angiography is often used to diagnose moyamoya disease. Moyamoya ("puff of smoke" in Japanese) disease was previously identified from angiograms showing telangiectatic vessels acting as collateral channels to the occluded distal carotid arteries.10 More recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to identify the abnormal occluded vessels as well as the dilated collateral vessels in the basal ganglia References 1. Headache Classification Committee of the International Headache Society. Classification and diagnostic criteria for headache disorders, cranial neuralgias and facial pain . Cephalalgia . 1988;8( (suppl 7) ):1-96.Crossref 2. Glista GG, Mellinger JF, Rooke ED. Familial hemiplegic migraine . Mayo Clin Proc . 1975; 50:307-311. 3. Verret S, Steele JC. Alternating hemiplegia in childhood: a report of eight patients with complicated migraine beginning in infancy . Pediatrics . 1971;47:675-680. 4. Yonekawa Y, Handa H, Okuno T. Moyamoya disease: diagnosis, treatment, and recent achievement . In: Barnett HJM, Mohr HJM, Yatsu FM, eds. Stroke: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management . New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone Inc; 1986:805-829. 5. Ausman JI, Diaz FG, Ma SH, Dujovny M, Sadasivan B. Cerebrovascular occlusive disease in children: a survey . Acta Neurochir (Wien) . 1988;94:117-128.Crossref 6. Bruno A, Adams HP Jr, Biller J, Resai K, Cornell S, Aschenbrener CA. Cerebral infarction due to moyamoya disease in young adults . Stroke . 1988;19:826-833.Crossref 7. Matsushima T, Fukui M, Fujii K, et al. Two pediatric cases with occlusions of the ipsilateral carotid and posterior cerebral arteries associated with moyamoya vessels: 'unilateral' moyamoya disease . Surg Neurol . 1990;33:276-280.Crossref 8. Prensky AL, Davis DO. Obstruction of major cerebral vessels in early childhood without neurological signs . Neurology . 1970;20:945-953.Crossref 9. Carlson CB, Harvey FH, Loop J. Progressive alternating hemiplegia in early childhood with basal arterial stenosis and telangiectasia (moyamoya syndrome) . Neurology . 1973;23: 734-744.Crossref 10. Gordon N, Isler W. Childhood moyamoya disease . Dev Med Child Neurol . 1989;31:98-107. 11. Bruno A, Yuh WTC, Biller J, Adams HP Jr, Cornell SH. Magnetic resonance imaging in young adults with cerebral infarction due to moyamoya . Arch Neurol . 1988;45:303-306.Crossref 12. Matsushima Y, Aoyagi M, Niimi Y, Masaoka H, Ohno K. Symptoms and their pattern of progression in childhood moyamoya disease . Brain Dev . 1990;12:784-789.Crossref 13. Rooney CM, Kaye EM, Scott RM, Klucznik RP, Rosman NP. Modified encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis as a surgical treatment of childhood moyamoya disease: report of five cases . J Child Neurol . 1991;6:24-31.Crossref

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1993

References