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Heat Thwarts HIV

Heat Thwarts HIV Mothers with HIV infection successfully followed a protocol for flash-heating their breast milk that inactivated the virus and reduced transmission to their infants, according to an international research team's feasibility study in sub-Saharan Africa (Chantry CJ et al. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2012;60[1]:43-50). The flash-heating protocol is a simple technique that involves expressing breast milk into a glass jar, which is placed in a pan with water and heated until the water boils. The milk is cooled and cup-fed to the infant. To determine whether women would use this approach, the researchers enrolled 101 women living with HIV infection in a resource-poor urban area of Tanzania. Of the 86 infants still alive and participating in the study at 5 months of age, 72 infants were HIV negative. Thirty-seven of the 72 eligible mothers chose to follow the protocol when their infants reached 6 months of age, more than the authors anticipated. Although antiviral prophylaxis is the optimal strategy for preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV, heat treatment of breast milk is an option that inactivates HIV and is recommended by the World Health Organization. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Heat Thwarts HIV

JAMA , Volume 307 (23) – Jun 20, 2012

Heat Thwarts HIV

Abstract

Mothers with HIV infection successfully followed a protocol for flash-heating their breast milk that inactivated the virus and reduced transmission to their infants, according to an international research team's feasibility study in sub-Saharan Africa (Chantry CJ et al. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2012;60[1]:43-50). The flash-heating protocol is a simple technique that involves expressing breast milk into a glass jar, which is placed in a pan with water and heated until the water boils....
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2012.6515
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mothers with HIV infection successfully followed a protocol for flash-heating their breast milk that inactivated the virus and reduced transmission to their infants, according to an international research team's feasibility study in sub-Saharan Africa (Chantry CJ et al. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2012;60[1]:43-50). The flash-heating protocol is a simple technique that involves expressing breast milk into a glass jar, which is placed in a pan with water and heated until the water boils. The milk is cooled and cup-fed to the infant. To determine whether women would use this approach, the researchers enrolled 101 women living with HIV infection in a resource-poor urban area of Tanzania. Of the 86 infants still alive and participating in the study at 5 months of age, 72 infants were HIV negative. Thirty-seven of the 72 eligible mothers chose to follow the protocol when their infants reached 6 months of age, more than the authors anticipated. Although antiviral prophylaxis is the optimal strategy for preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV, heat treatment of breast milk is an option that inactivates HIV and is recommended by the World Health Organization.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 20, 2012

Keywords: hiv,heat (physical force)

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