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HEART DISPLACEMENT APPARENTLY DUE TO MEDIASTINAL EMPHYSEMA FOLLOWING ASPIRATION PNEUMONIA

HEART DISPLACEMENT APPARENTLY DUE TO MEDIASTINAL EMPHYSEMA FOLLOWING ASPIRATION PNEUMONIA Heart displacement in children is ordinarily due to the presence either of free fluid or free air in the pleural cavity. The following case illustrates a marked type of displacement of the heart to the right in which neither pleuritic effusion, hydrothorax nor pneumothorax played a rôle. REPORT OF CASE G. P., aged 4 years, Sept. 10, 1919, at 4 p. m., fell into a pile of sand, and on being picked up by his mother stated that he had swallowed some of the sand. No effect was evident at that time, but when the boy was put to bed at 6 p. m., two hours after the accident, musical sounds were heard all over his chest, and he was breathing very rapidly. He was taken to the Children's Hospital four hours after the accident, at which time physical examination revealed nothing beyond the presence of a large number of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

HEART DISPLACEMENT APPARENTLY DUE TO MEDIASTINAL EMPHYSEMA FOLLOWING ASPIRATION PNEUMONIA

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1921 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1921.01910320103014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Heart displacement in children is ordinarily due to the presence either of free fluid or free air in the pleural cavity. The following case illustrates a marked type of displacement of the heart to the right in which neither pleuritic effusion, hydrothorax nor pneumothorax played a rôle. REPORT OF CASE G. P., aged 4 years, Sept. 10, 1919, at 4 p. m., fell into a pile of sand, and on being picked up by his mother stated that he had swallowed some of the sand. No effect was evident at that time, but when the boy was put to bed at 6 p. m., two hours after the accident, musical sounds were heard all over his chest, and he was breathing very rapidly. He was taken to the Children's Hospital four hours after the accident, at which time physical examination revealed nothing beyond the presence of a large number of

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1921

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