Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Health Promotion and Nurses-Reply

Health Promotion and Nurses-Reply Abstract In Reply.— Baggs asks if nurse practitioners staffing the health promotion clinic program in our trial1 partly explains its better prevention outcomes, compared with results for the two clinic-integrated models directed at physicians or patients.The high quality of patient care by nurse practitioners and their contribution to ambulatory care are well documented in many studies. That issue has been laid to rest. In this study, Veterans Administration patients voluntarily attended the health promotion clinic program and did not know in advance who staffed the clinic. Their motivation was a personal interest in preventive services unavailable at their usual clinic vist. After attending the program, however, they said that nurse practitioners "were competent," "allowed me to ask questions," and "conveyed a sense of respect" (unpublished data). Undoubtedly, this expressed satisfaction was a major factor affecting decisions to return for annual re-examinations at such a high (90%) rate.We used References 1. Belcher DW. Implementing preventive services: success and failure in an outpatient trial . Arch Intern Med. 1990;150:2533-2541.Crossref 2. Carter A, Thompson RS, Bourdeau RV. A clinically effective breast screening program can be cost-effective too . prev Med. 1987;16:19-34.Crossref 3. Hall JA, Palmer RH, Orav EJ, et al. Performance quailty, gender, and professional role: a study of physicians and nonphysicians in 16 ambulatory care practices . Med Care. 1990;28:489-501.Crossref 4. Belcher DW, Berg AO, Inui TS. Practical approaches to providing better preventive care: are physicians a problem or a solution? Am J prev Med. 1988;4( (suppl) ):27-48. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Health Promotion and Nurses-Reply

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 151 (12) – Dec 1, 1991

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/health-promotion-and-nurses-reply-wSgfE007nr
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1991.00400120112030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In Reply.— Baggs asks if nurse practitioners staffing the health promotion clinic program in our trial1 partly explains its better prevention outcomes, compared with results for the two clinic-integrated models directed at physicians or patients.The high quality of patient care by nurse practitioners and their contribution to ambulatory care are well documented in many studies. That issue has been laid to rest. In this study, Veterans Administration patients voluntarily attended the health promotion clinic program and did not know in advance who staffed the clinic. Their motivation was a personal interest in preventive services unavailable at their usual clinic vist. After attending the program, however, they said that nurse practitioners "were competent," "allowed me to ask questions," and "conveyed a sense of respect" (unpublished data). Undoubtedly, this expressed satisfaction was a major factor affecting decisions to return for annual re-examinations at such a high (90%) rate.We used References 1. Belcher DW. Implementing preventive services: success and failure in an outpatient trial . Arch Intern Med. 1990;150:2533-2541.Crossref 2. Carter A, Thompson RS, Bourdeau RV. A clinically effective breast screening program can be cost-effective too . prev Med. 1987;16:19-34.Crossref 3. Hall JA, Palmer RH, Orav EJ, et al. Performance quailty, gender, and professional role: a study of physicians and nonphysicians in 16 ambulatory care practices . Med Care. 1990;28:489-501.Crossref 4. Belcher DW, Berg AO, Inui TS. Practical approaches to providing better preventive care: are physicians a problem or a solution? Am J prev Med. 1988;4( (suppl) ):27-48.

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1991

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month