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Headaches and Brain Tumors

Headaches and Brain Tumors Abstract Headache, along with seizure disorders and various psychomotor developmental and learning problems, constitute the bulk of reasons for referral for the opinion of a child neurologist. It is apparent that these problems tend to make the pediatrician sufficiently "nervous" to desire a second opinion in order to share the diagnostic and management responsibility. The overwhelming majority of these symptomatic manifestations of disease are based on medically benign or static processes, but the pediatrician and the pediatric neurologist both know that tucked in amongst this large group of patients are those with progressive, sometimes remediable, disease, including brain tumor. Although computed tomography (CT) has become widely available as a simple, relatively noninvasive, and reasonably inexpensive method of intracranial imaging, it cannot be recommended as a routine approach to screen all young patients with headache or seizure disorder. We require a set of clinical clues that raise the index of suspicion References 1. Barlow CF: Migraine in childhood . Res Clin Stud Headache 1978;5:34-46. 2. Page LK, Lombroso CT, Matson DD: Childhood epilepsy with late detection of cerebral glioma . J Neurosurg 1969;31:253-261.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1982 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1982.03970380011002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Headache, along with seizure disorders and various psychomotor developmental and learning problems, constitute the bulk of reasons for referral for the opinion of a child neurologist. It is apparent that these problems tend to make the pediatrician sufficiently "nervous" to desire a second opinion in order to share the diagnostic and management responsibility. The overwhelming majority of these symptomatic manifestations of disease are based on medically benign or static processes, but the pediatrician and the pediatric neurologist both know that tucked in amongst this large group of patients are those with progressive, sometimes remediable, disease, including brain tumor. Although computed tomography (CT) has become widely available as a simple, relatively noninvasive, and reasonably inexpensive method of intracranial imaging, it cannot be recommended as a routine approach to screen all young patients with headache or seizure disorder. We require a set of clinical clues that raise the index of suspicion References 1. Barlow CF: Migraine in childhood . Res Clin Stud Headache 1978;5:34-46. 2. Page LK, Lombroso CT, Matson DD: Childhood epilepsy with late detection of cerebral glioma . J Neurosurg 1969;31:253-261.Crossref

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1982

References

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